What Is Your Company's Cell Phone Policy?

Today, 87% U.S. residents own at least a cell phone; the number increases to 92% among Americans with jobs. People may also use “smart phones” to stay in touch with their Facebook or Twitter friends. No matter how important cell phones are, many hotels and restaurants prohibit employees’ improper cell phone usage --- seriously, how would you feel if your waiter and waitress pays more attention to his/her cell phone than you as a customer? Improper cell phone usage affects service quality, company image, and productivity. So, what is your cell phone policy?

If your hotel or restaurant has not had a cell phone policy yet, probably it is time to make one now. McCorvey discusses at Inc.com about what decision makers need to put into considerations when creating a cell phone policy. In addition, a link of http://www.epolicyinstitute.com/ is provided for those who want to start with online “fill-in-the-blank sample policies.”

If how to create a cell phone policy does not apply to everyone, “cell phone etiquette” will. Here are some examples:
1. Use “vibrate” in a professional atmosphere.
2. No phone calls during interviews, meetings, or the time when serving guests.
3. Instead of picking up a call, it is fine to let callers leave a message.
4. Keep a low voice if we must answer a call.
5. Watch out our languages, especially when we are in front of others.
6. E-mails, Facebook messages, twits can wait; but your customers or your boss will not.

Do I miss anything? Please feel free to add more to the list.

References:
Inc.com: http://www.inc.com/guides/how-to-create-a-cell-phone-policy.html
Picture was copied from http://www.saidaonline.com/en/newsgfx/smart%20phone1-saidaonline.jpg

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