Chain Restaurants Show Social Responsibility by Saving Fisheries

When a restaurant chain serves millions of customers every day, adding or removing a menu item could greatly impact the environment. For example, when McDonald’s introduced Alaskan Pollock, the consumption of Alaskan Pollock increased dramatically. McDonald’s strategy would not only impact the stock of Alaskan Pollock but also affect other species in the same food supply chain, such as Steller sea lions and fur seals. The fact is McDonald’s buys 50,000 metric tons of whitefishes every year.

The good news is several restaurant chains, including McDonald’s Corp, Yum Brands Inc., and Darden Restaurants, have joined the growing movement toward eco-friendly practices to help sustain species (The Wall Street Journal, July 12). Fishes sold in McDonald’s come from sources that meet sustainability guidelines, such as the ones given by the Marine Stewardship Council. Darden Restaurants, which owns Red Lobster, incorporate more grains in recipes to reduce seafood-based consumptions.

Another alternative is to promote aquaculture and raise seafood “in enclosed, controlled environment.” The problem is not all fishes can survive with aquaculture. Some sophisticated seafood consumers may not like raised seafood.

Here, I am not trying to put all social responsibility to restaurant chains or the corporate America. I argue that everyone living in this world is accounted for sustainability. What are your suggestions?

References:
Ziobro, P. (2010, July 12). Restaurants mobilize to save fisheries. The Wall Street Journal, p. B4. Picture was downloaded from: http://www.fdb.org.pk/readmore4.html

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