Student Resumes

I see resumes as a personal statement that highlights a person’s achievements over time. Accordingly, a good resume can be “personal,” where the person needs to make the ultimate decision on what should be included in the document. Meanwhile, a good resume must demonstrate a person’s qualification(s) for a targeting job with “quantifiable” achievements and “outcomes.”

I teach students how to write an efficient resume in my Leadership and Career Management class. In general, I make the following suggestions to college students:

1. Objective is NOT necessary because a vain objective is a useless statement while a specific objective narrows a person’s career options. A specific objective may work if a person is exceptional and has interest in only one particular career option.

2. In terms of education, information of high school diploma, the department name or the college name is not important. However, the university that issues the degree, the degree itself, major(s) or minor(s), and expected graduation date are important.

3. In addition to using action words in describing professional experience, it is critical to “quantify” a person’s work and demonstrate the “results” of this person’s effort. If a student participated in a marketing campaign, recruiters want to know how many attendees the student or the team attracts. How much money does the student or team make in the end? It is good to know if a student works hard, but it would be even more impressive if a student’s work makes contributions or creates significant outcomes.

4. Leadership should become a “watermark” of a student’s resume. A student can demonstrate his/her leadership skills by showing a progressive career path over years or through the leadership roles a student takes at work or in extra-curricular activities.

5. When listing skills, please only list the skills that will set a person apart from other candidates. Microsoft Word, Excel, and PowerPoint are old technologies, and every college students should be very efficient in these tools. So, they are not important. However, Proficiencies in Microsoft Visio, Microsoft Project, Photoshop, Prezi for presentations, Java Design etc. could be important.

What are your suggestions?

References:
Picture was downloaded from Blog.Hrinmotion.com via: http://tinyurl.com/linchikwok09282010P

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