Top Universities in Corporate Recruiters’ Mind - Part I

The Wall Street Journal asked 842 recruiting executives to rank the top universities with the best bachelor-degree graduates who are best-trained and educated and best able to succeed after hire. Based on the results of 479 responses, the top three universities are Penn State, Texas A&M, and University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. My home school Texas Tech (as shown in the pictures) is named the No. 18 in the list.

The costs for college recruiting could run up to $5,000 per grad. During recession, corporate has greatly curtailed recruiting budget. Recruiters want to make sure their effort has good return. One indication of success is to measure how many grads are hired and how long these hires will stay within the company. As a result, recruiters like those schools who have the most prepared and well-rounded students, whose graduates fit well into the corporate culture, and those with the best track record over time. In particular, employers like schools where they can form partnerships with both professors and students.

My dissertation was also about college recruitment and employee selection. I found similar research findings regarding those grads who received job offers. I also worked in the Career Center in the College of Human Sciences at Texas Tech before. I understand the important role a faculty or a staff member plays in the college recruitment-selection process. As an assistant professor at SU, I reach out and work hard to build relationships between SU and industry professionals. However, I don’t believe my sole effort would help. A long-term partnership has to be formed with three parties’ efforts --- corporate recruiters, faculty and staff members in a university, and students. Tomorrow, I will further discuss the implications of this Wall Street Journal report to today’s college students. What are your thoughts?

References:
Evans, T. (2010, September 13). State schools lure more employers: Recruiters like one-stop-shopping for grads with solid academics, job skills, record of success. The Wall Street Journal, p. B1, B8. (http://on.wsj.com/aLwYwE)

Popular posts from this blog

Convenience over Class: Serving Vino in Cans (by Kristen Rinck)

2017 hotel trends: Some indications from AHLA 2016 Lodging Survey

Public Relations and Social Media (by Marlon Wong Granados)