Dress to Impress: “Old-Fashioned” Business Attire Still Works

High fashion may work well in the New York Fashion Show, but the Wall Street may prefer something more conservative. The Wall Street Journal features a discussion on UBS’ dress code. The Swiss bank UBS AG has a 43-page dress code for all retail banking staff because the company believes “first impressions count.” Some of the Do’s and Don’ts include:
DO’S
For women:
Wear your jacket buttoned. When sitting, the buttons should be unfastened.
Make sure to touch up hair re-growth regularly if you color your hair.
For man:
Store your suit on a large hanger with rounded shoulders to preserve the shape of the garment.
Schedule barber appointments every four weeks to maintain your haircut shape.

DON’S
Eating garlic and onions.
Smoking or spending time in smoke-filled places.
Wearing short-sleeved shirts or cuff links.
Wearing socks that are too short, showing your skin while sitting.
Allowing underwear to be seen.
Touching up perfume during or after lunch break.
Using tie knots that don’t match your face shape and/or body shape.

I believe that the hospitality industry is somehow “conservative.”I advise students to dress in “old-fashioned” business attire during job interviews. What are your opinions? What is your company's dress code?


References:
Berton, E. (2010, December 15). Dress to impress, UBS tells its staff. The Wall Street Journal, p. C1 & C2. (You may also access this article at online.wsj.com via http://on.wsj.com/epRQTX)
Picture was downloaded from Thinktank-hassanraza.blogspot.com via http://tinyurl.com/linchikwok12162010P  

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