Teaching Social Media in Business Schools: What Needs to Be Covered?

Earlier this month, I attended the International Entrepreneurship Faculty Development Program at University of Colorado Denver. Rahim Fazal (@rahimthedream), a three-time company co-founder, spoke to us on how Facebook is transforming entrepreneurship. In Rahim’s words, social media has made significant impact on 5Cs --- conversations, collaboration, connectedness, content, and customization.

I agree with Rahim that social media has changed and is still changing the way people are doing business. It becomes obvious that social media must be included in business education. There are forward-thinking business schools offering courses on social media. To my knowledge, however, many of these classes are taught as a marketing course. That may make sense because social media can be very effective in relationship marketing, but I argue that social media is more than just sales or marketing. Human resources, for example, is another area that uses social media to a large extent. Accordingly, as much as I believe that companies must include every functional and operational department into consideration when developing their corporate social media strategy, I suggest that business schools also need to cover social media content in every related subject. Or, they should offer a social media course through a multidisciplinary lens. I myself teach social media as a personal and business communication tool in my social media class, in which B2C and marketing communication is discussed along with the C2C, B2B, C2B, B2G, G2B, G2C, and C2G communication.    

What important social media competences do you expect from college graduates? In which class(es) should business schools cover the social media content? If you believe that social media should be a standalone course, what should be taught in that class?  

Relevant discussions:

References:
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