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In-room workout in hotels

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Want to stay active on the road but at the same time, skip the hotel gym?  Now, we can as more hotel chains are incorporating the in-room fitness concept. The latest update I heard is Hilton Hotels & Resorts just unveiled a new in-room fitness concept — Five Feet to Fitness. Travelers are now able to do various exercises inside the newly renovated Hilton guestroom in select locations: The newly renovated guestroom will be equipped with TRX, a workout system that leverages gravity and body weights in workouts, as well as a Gym Rax storage bay, providing the accessories needed for yoga, meditation, body weight, strength and other exercise programs right inside the guestroom.The storage bay comes with a fitness kiosk that provides 200-plus exercise tutorials and more than 25 workout classes, guiding travelers how to use the equipment inside the guestroom.Wattbike is also placed inside the guestroom for guided indoor cycling exercises.There is a hydration station inside the guestroom wi…

Consumers' path of purchasing a travel product

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Hotels have been working hard to win more travelers to "book direct" on their companies' websites, but are consumers listening? In fact, hotels are not alone. All service providers in the hospitality and tourism industry want their customers to make purchases directly on their websites, but consumers want to search and compare various options before making a decision. So, to convince customers to purchase directly on the service providers' websites, companies must understand where their customers "hang out" in the cyber marketplace before they make the purchasing decision, as well as where they end up buying their services. The white paper "Understanding the Travel Consumer's Path to Purchase" by Eye for Travel provides some business intelligence in that regard. The report combined a large panel consumer data of online transactions and surveys into the analysis, revealing the following results: The places where customers purchase a travel produ…

Can hotels stop the growth of Airbnb?

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As a substitute for the traditional lodging facilities, including hotels, hostels and short-term rentals, the increasing supply of Airbnb properties is no doubt making an impact on hotels' bottom lines. So, can hotels stop the growth of Airbnb?  Hotels' strategies for fighting against Airbnb Hotels are working hard to fight against the competition from Airbnb, other room-sharing websites and online travel agents (OTAs). For example: Hotels are encouraging travelers to search and make reservations directly on the hotels' websites by offering special discounts if they book directly, even though this strategy might possibly push Airbnb and OTAs to work closely together against hotels.Hotels are reinventing loyalty programs to win more new travelers and, at the same time, keep their repeat customers.More hotels are adding local flavors to lure travelers. If travelers choose Airbnb over hotels because they want to gain some unique experience as a local resident, this strategy ma…

Let's imagine how hotels and restaurants are run in smart cities

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We have seen more robots and machines are replacing humans in the service sector. This trend is irreversible, but the good news is there are ways to cope with such changes at work. What if these changes also take place in the macro level? Then, what can businesses do to embrace this wave of innovations? Indeed, the cities where we live have also become "smarter" than ever. According to The Wall Street Journal, more cities are now using different types of data to make people's living safer and healthier and the cities' operations more efficient. The rise of smart citiesBoston The city works with Waze, a navigation app from Google, to improve traffic conditions. Officials are able to respond to traffic problems, such as a double-parked truck or a fender-bender more quickly. Chicago The Department of Innovation and Technology developed an algorithm to predict the risk of a restaurant for spreading food-borne illnesses. The algorithm uses 11 variables in prediction, includin…

How not to get replaced by machines

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I was not exaggerating in my previous article when I discussed how "machines are now replacing humans in service jobs." If it is still difficult to convince you, here is an additional example: "Meet Sally, the robot who makes perfect salads." This machine specializes in only one menu item — salad — yet it can do a better job than most chefs. For example: It can make salads within 60 seconds.It makes salad with perfect proportions, even with accurate calorie counts.It can create more than 1,000 salads from the 21 ingredients stored inside the machine.Those 21 ingredients can be changed over time, making it possible for the machine to create even more salads.It weighs 350 pounds.It has a price tag of $30,000, but can also be leased for $500 a month. "What? A machine that costs over $10,000? That is too expensive, especially when we consider the high maintenance fees associated with the machines. There is no way that restaurants would use such expensive machines t…

Machines are now replacing humans in service jobs

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I am not joking. Machine serving people has now become the new reality, as I suggested in my recent discussion on Multibriefs.com .



Here are just some examples:
A restaurant with no hosts, no waiters, and no tablesBurger-flipping robotsRobot baristasRobot that makes saladsSelf-ordering service - Domino's Pizza, McDonald's, Starbucks, and Wendy'sFood delivery robotsThe robotic butler service in hotelsThe automatic drink dispenserPersonal assistantsSelf-driving carsDoes it become obvious that the new era of machines serving people has already arrived? I think it is now the time for those who are feeling the panic of being replaced by machines or robots at work to reconsider their career paths. Manual labor will certainly be replaced, and the only way for us to survive in this competition is to become the leaders in the field.

How to shut down bad online reviews

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What can managers do to shut down bad online reviews? Here is a real example: 

It started at the Broadway Oyster Bar in St. Louis this February when Mary S., a Yelper, left the business with a one-star rating and a description of the negative experience she received in the restaurant. As a reference, the restaurant is now being monitored by Yelp for any content related to media reports, meaning some reviews have been or would be removed from the business's page on Yelp, but the restaurant has an overall 4.4 star rating from more than 900 Yelpers in March. Mary went there for a birthday dinner. She claimed that she had a reservation for a party of nine people, but the party waited for two hours before they were finally seated. To make it even worse, because there were three additional people joining the party and the manager was unwilling to work with them, they would have to wait for longer to be seated together or be split up. She then took the group of 12 people with her to a nearb…