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In-room workout in hotels


Want to stay active on the road but at the same time, skip the hotel gym? 
Now, we can as more hotel chains are incorporating the in-room fitness concept. The latest update I heard is Hilton Hotels & Resorts just unveiled a new in-room fitness concept — Five Feet to Fitness. Travelers are now able to do various exercises inside the newly renovated Hilton guestroom in select locations:
  • The newly renovated guestroom will be equipped with TRX, a workout system that leverages gravity and body weights in workouts, as well as a Gym Rax storage bay, providing the accessories needed for yoga, meditation, body weight, strength and other exercise programs right inside the guestroom.
  • The storage bay comes with a fitness kiosk that provides 200-plus exercise tutorials and more than 25 workout classes, guiding travelers how to use the equipment inside the guestroom.
  • Wattbike is also placed inside the guestroom for guided indoor cycling exercises.
  • There is a hydration station inside the guestroom with five complimentary beverages, ranging from water to Core Power.
  • Biofreeze, "a topical analgesic that uses the cooling effect of menthol as a natural pain reliever," is included as a bathroom amenity.
In fact, Hilton is not the only hotel chain embracing the healthy living trend, nor is it the first hotel chain that introduced the in-room fitness concept. Here are some examples from Westin:
The Move Well concept at Westin: The Westin Hotels and Resorts designed the Move Well concept with multiple programs, ranging from Gear Lending to 24/7 Fitness StudiosTo me, it is the RunWESTIN and WestinWORKOUT programs that really make this Move Well concept stand out.
The RunWESTIN program: The RunWESTIN program welcomes runners of all levels. This program is usually designed with scenic three- and five-mile running routes in a destination. The run can either be led by a “Run Concierge” or through the guests’ own navigation with a RUNWESTIN map.
The WestinWORKOUT room: This program is similar to the Hilton's Five Feet to Fitness concept. The idea is to bring the workout equipment to guestrooms. Today, travelers can choose to stay in a WestinWORKOUT room in select locations.
There are other popular fitness programs in hotels, even though none of them has become a brand standard of a particular hotel chain yet, such as personal trainers and partnerships with local cutting-edge gym facilities.
Now that The Westin and Hilton have already introduced the in-room fitness programs, will other hotel chains follow? In addition, do you think hotels in general are doing enough to embrace the wellness and healthy living trend? What other cool fitness or wellness programs do you see in hotels? What improvements would you recommend?
A longer coverage of this article was published on MultiBrief.com

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