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Element Hotels: Redefining your extended stay experience (By Mateusz Pasierbek)

Stylish, sustainable, and innovative - those are some of the most important features (or keywords) that many eco-friendly consumers are looking for. With the recent trend of travelers looking into more environmentally conscious tourism, the hotel industry is facing a higher than ever demand from consumers for eco-friendly products.

Current hotel markets offer a variety of different environmentally-friendly choices such as EVEN by IHG, Hyatt House by Hyatt, and Homewood Suites by Hilton, but in my opinions, only one of them offers a truly unique experience for this niche market --- The Element Hotels. “Built for today’s eco-conscious travelers, the Element brand has completely changed the face of extended stay with its light-filled atmosphere, eco-minded design and commitment to innovation,” said Brian McGuinness, Senior Vice President of Specialty Select Brands for Starwood Hotels.


Element Hotels, previously part of the Starwood Hotels portfolio and now under Marriott International, was established in 2006 with an idea of smart, nature-inspired design that would redefine the extended stay hotel industry. Two years later, the company opened its first location in Lexington, Massachusetts; Irving, Texas; Arundel Mills, Maryland; and Las Vegas, Nevada. Presently, as of 2018, Element Hotels has expanded globally and continuities to grow. The hotel plans to quadruple its footprint by 2019 with over 100+ properties.

So what makes Element Hotels a better choice than the competitors? It’s a combination of bright modern design, eco-friendly practices, and an innovative guest experience that makes travelers choose this brand over others.

Going Green

As the brand is committed to bringing more sustainable buildings into communities, all of its properties are built from the ground up and hold a LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) certification. In addition, the company is committed to eco-friendly practices wherever possible, including lobby areas, parking lots, fitness rooms, and of course, guest rooms. Some of the most important methods consist of using energy efficient appliances and lighting, water-efficient faucets, low VOC (Volatile Organic Compounds) paint, and environmentally-conscious shower amenities.

Rise, Restore, Relax


Whether staying for just a night or a whole week, Element Hotels provides a complimentary RISE signature breakfast featuring fresh made-to-order items that change daily, smoothies, yogurt stations, fresh fruits, and more. The hotel also thinks for the guests who are on the run or would like to prepare their own meals in their rooms by offering healthy and simple meals that are available at the hotel gourmet pantry. Another important feature of the brand is its innovative use of public space for guests who want to relax and connect with others. For example, “Communal Room,” is a “concept that consists of multiple rooms centered around a common living room space that allows guests in the surrounding rooms to congregate, interact, work or dine.”

Lifestyle


If complimentary breakfast and eco-friendly practices were not enough, the hotels also provide 24/7 access to state-of-the-art fitness centers equipped with cardio machines as well as full access to the Your Trainer app. This free app keeps track of guests’ workouts, fitness levels, and unique training activities. Element Hotels also offers complimentary bike rentals at over 25+ hotels across the U.S. Thanks to its partnership with Priority Bicycles, guests can maintain a healthy and balanced lifestyle.

Element Guest Experience

Thanks to its sustainable design, the hotel rooms provide truly unique eco-friendly experience with many features such as oversized windows that allow natural light, low-flow faucets and fixtures, CFL (Compact Fluorescent Lamp) lighting, and energy-saving appliances throughout the room. In addition, all rooms are equipped with Westin Heavenly® Beds, spa-inspired bathrooms with oversize showers and rain showerheads, and low natural bathroom amenities that are stored in a dispenser system.

Have you ever stayed at one of their hotels? Do you think there’s a need for more eco-friendly hotels like Element Hotels?

About the Author 

Mateusz Pasierbek is currently a student at Cal Poly Pomona pursuing his degree in Hospitality Management. After moving from Poland six years ago, he has gained valuable work experience in numerous places, such as The Resort at Pelican Hill, Orange Hill Restaurant, Irvine Marriott, and Sheraton Fairplex Pomona. During his spare time, he enjoys traveling internationally and is passionate about landscape photography. After graduating, Mateusz is planning to continue his hospitality career with Marriott International as a Rooms Operation Voyager on the East Coast for a luxury brand such as the Ritz Carlton or a St. Regis. In the future, Mateusz’s goal is to become a Director of Sales & Marketing in South-East Asia in a luxury segment.

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