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Do You Have the Guts to Become an Entrepreneur?

Last Thursday, Isaac Budmen, co-founder of Little Tinker and a current SU graduate student, shared his entrepreneurial experience with us in my social media class. His presentation was short but inspiring.

Isaac recalled his experience of how he met with Dennis Crowley, co-founder of Foursquare and an SU alumnus. At first, Isaac was unable to set up an appointment with Dennis using his SU connections. Then, he went to Twitter. “Surprisingly,” he received a tweet from Dennis and finally met with him for a conversation. What a great example of using Twitter!  

The founding of Little Tinker did not come from a brilliant idea or a 10-billion plan; it was simply triggered by an incident where Isaac and his friends added the hashtag of #Drinkup in their tweets during a happy hour. All of a sudden, #Drinkup became a global phenomenon. Isaac saw that as a great opportunity and “jumped in” to pursue his entrepreneurship ideas --- an entrepreneur may not know everything of starting up a new business and there will be mistakes on the road, but s/he must “jump in” and start working on the “small” ideas.

I believe that great business ideas must root in useful service, but not all ideas need to be “big.” As entrepreneurs “jump in,” they can further twist their ideas for a better business plan.

Do you have the guts to “jump in” and become an entrepreneur? What other lessons do you learn from Isaac’s experience?

Comments

  1. Social media sites have definitely made is easier to for people to make small little things grow into successful entrepreneur ideas. I believe twitter is a great example of this because people can even make up a saying and having trending all across the country. These sayings also turn into actual accounts that people make to attract followers. These accounts get so much popularity that I believe like YouTube, twitter will start paying people when they reach a certain amount of followers. This just shows how much influence these networking cites can have people and how much success can come from just one little hashtag.

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