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Are you worried if you would get penalized for choosing remote work?

A female worker looking worried in front of a laptop

Many people were forced to work from home when the pandemic hit. After two years of remote work, people have discovered the benefits that remote work offers. People want the flexibility of where, how, when, and how much they work, but companies have begun demanding workers to work in the office. More people become anxious about their careers if they continue working from home.    

Where does the anxiety come from? 

 

Some companies have already required employees to resume in-person work five days a week; others still offer hybrid work schedules or fully remote work to employees. The anxiety arises when employees worry that their choice of remote work would hurt their careers. 

 

“If you want a job, stay remote all the time. If you want a career, engage with the rest of us in the office. … No judgment on which you pick, but don’t be surprised or disappointed by certain outcomes.” said a CEO of an investment banking company. 

 

Remote work might not offer people as much “exposure” at work as compared to in-person work. Hence, remote workers’ contributions might not be recognized easily. Hence, they may feel the pressure to work in the office more often. 

 

For some people, remote work is a trade-off between life and a career. They want a life and do not mind sacrificing their career. However, a voice also says people should not be penalized for their choices. They believe people need not choose between life and a career. They want both.   

 

Remote work in the hospitality and tourism industry

 

Most jobs in the hospitality and tourism industry require in-person interactions. Still, some back-of-the-house or managerial jobs, such as call centers and analytic work, can be done remotely. 

 

I spoke to a few Cal Poly Pomona alums holding managerial positions in the industry. They told me they did not feel comfortable working at home often while all front-line employees were required to work on the property full time. Plus, working in the office makes it easier for them to handle any unexpected circumstances on the property.

If you get to choose, will you want to work in the office or at home? What are the reasons? 

 

References

 

Brower, T. (2022, August 14). Power is shifting away from employees: Can remote work survive? Forbes Magazine. Available via https://www.forbes.com/sites/tracybrower/2022/08/14/power-is-shifting-away-from-employees-can-remote-work-survive/

 

Ganun, J. (2022, August 18). A new work anxiety: Will I be penalized for working from home? The NPR News. Available via https://www.npr.org/2022/08/18/1111157591/return-to-office-career-job-work-from-home-punish


Note: This article was also published in The Hospitality News Magazine. The picture was downloaded from VirtualVocations.com.

Comments

  1. As someone in the Hospitality Industry, I personally would choose to work in an office or in person. My passion is people, and that is meeting people, getting to know them, interacting on a day to day basis, face-to-face. That is a little harder to accomplish when working from home. I do not think there is anything wrong with working from home, especially if it fits your life needs and is essential to your day to day life. There are many great jobs that can be accomplished at home and many amazing companies that have nailed the working from home style after the Covid-19 pandemic. The Hospitality Industry took a big hit when Covid-19 struck, but one of the main reasons that is, is because of human interaction and how that was lost for so long. While my personal reasons align with meeting people and being in a work place from day to day, I also believe that are many ways to accomplish meeting new people in new ways we could not have accomplished years back. With growing technology we can accomplish more than we know.
    HRT3500.02

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  2. Personally I would chose to work in person because i am one that thrives off the connections that I make with my team and coworkers and I look forward to the experiences, conversations etc that I would be having with them daily. I also feel like it is easier to respond to any unforeseen circumstances and stay in the loop since you are on site as opposed to waiting for the information to be relayed to you at home. But I don't think that anyone should be judged or penalized for choosing to work from home/remotely. If that works for employees and they are still helping the company and doing their job but able to go to more of their children's events, travel etc by working remotely then go right ahead but they should never be threatened by penalization.
    Ayden De Avila HRT 3500 Section #02 Class #74842

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  3. I think I would chose to work in person, with face-to-face work, misunderstandings are avoided and communication between team members is progressively diminishing due to I think I would choose to work in person, with face-to-face work, misunderstandings are avoided and communication between team members is progressively diminishing due to the extra effort involved. Remote work would imply facing certain challenges, the difficulty of which may vary according to the personality and preferences of each one. We will lose regular contact with coworkers. By doing our work from home, it could make us feel lonely due to the lack of social contact. If we highly value sharing time with our colleagues, and recommend holding video conferences via Zoom or Meet, or frequent phone calls, even if we are not for a specific work purpose.(Lucero Chen Zhu from HRT 3500 section 02)

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  4. When it comes to working remote or in the office, I would choose working from the office. I currently work remotely, and it is not the same experience as working in the office. When you are in the office you get more of a hands-on experience and can solve your problems faster by either asking someone or having the materials you need. Working from home does give you more flexibility and a life, but you are not gaining the same experience. Being in the office also builds your communication skills, collaboration skills, and social engagement. Working from an office gives you a healthier lifestyle as you are getting up and moving your body around instead of just sitting down as soon as you get up.
    HRT3500.02

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