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Managing the Millennials at Work

As more and more Millennials are graduating and entering the work force, managing the Millennials, Gen Xs, and Boomers under the same roof could be challenging. Last month’s HR Magazine dedicated almost a whole issue addressing the generation gaps issue. So does this ABC News video.

I love the way how this video talks about the Millennial phenomenon. I teach many Millennials in class. I agree that (a) many of them have the sense of “entitlement,” (b) they could be very energetic with the “right” motivation and always want to be “engaged,” (c) many of them are very creative and technology savvy, (d) they need clear guidelines, (e) they want acknowledgement (who doesn’t?), and (f) many of them need good advice on e-mail, cell phone, and social media etiquette. What advices does this video give to the Millennials?
  • Expect to work hard in the work place.
  • Listen to those who offer critiques --- those who “bother” to provide constructive criticisms may not tell the most beautiful things in the world; but they care.
  • Pay attention to a person’s online presence.
  • Learn the right e-mail etiquette --- write in complete sentences, use spell check, and be careful of what is said on e-mails.
What other advices do you have for the Millennials? If you are a Millennial, what suggestions will you give to Gen Xs and Boomers so that they can create a better work environment for you?

Comments

  1. Since I am considered a Millennial, I believe many people from my generation still have the idea that they are “entitled” to everything they want. When in group settings, it is obvious who wants to earn and achieve a successful result, and who feels they should automatically have the work be done for them and receive the same results. I think people need to start taking responsibility for their actions, work hard to achieve what they truly want, or suffer the consequences. Nowadays people also expect to be rewarded for doing their basic job. Work is work, and while you should be able to enjoy benefits of a job well done, employees shouldn’t expect to be patted on the back constantly. In an ever-changing society, it is essential that people can be counted on to get their job done to the best of their ability so that systems can run smoothly. While some of the new generation has lost the concept of “You get what you give,” many others have lots of new skills, ideas, and energy to offer to potential employers. They are also innovative and tech savvy, which are great qualities for the workplace.

    -Lindsey LaDue, NSD 314

    ReplyDelete
  2. Thanks for the comments, Lindsey. While I do not want to blame everything to schools, I feel both parents and professors/teachers need to inform the Millennials the "reality” while allowing them to utilize their talents.

    ReplyDelete
  3. I was appealed by the article, as it genuinely showcases the concept of Human Resource Management based on the differences of the demography. Indeed, the difference in generation and age group impacts the working culture, behavior and work outputs, and the ultimate pressure lies upon the Human Resource managers, who need to seek newer and smarter ways to cope and facilitate the Millenials. In my opinion, the difference in psychology and behavior often influences the performance and procedures, which is well explained in the article. Managing the Millenials at work also refers to an effective management system that can allow the differences in their methods and ability to be utilized rather than fall under oppressive culture. Human Resource Management greatly deals with providing the workforce with motivational as well as the performance-boosting environment and managing the Millenials is a significant focus in the modern working climate.
    -------------Pengxuan Chen (HRT 350)

    ReplyDelete

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