Skip to main content

“Travel, as we knew it, is over,” but there are hopes still

Airbnb co-founder Brian Chesky talked about the future of travel in a CNBC interview last week. He stated:


“Travel, as we knew it, is over. It doesn’t mean travel is over, just the travel we knew is over, and it’s never coming back. It’s just not.”


His statement made headlines last week, but he also suggested in the same interview:  

 

 “… travel is going to come back. It’s just going to take a lot longer than, you know, we would have thought, and it’s going to be different.”


What do you think? Will people travel again?


The glass is half empty

 

Some places saw a spark of confirmed infected cases of COVID-19 in just a few weeks after the local governments lifted the coronavirus restrictions. Florida, for example, reported that its daily case count had increased fivefold in just two weeks. Moreover, the median age of the new patients dropped to 36, indicating the coronavirus is now spreading among the younger age group.

 

Along with Florida, Texas and Arizona also reported record numbers of confirmed infected cases and emerged as the new epicenters. Arizona and Georgia recorded the highest number of new cases on Sunday. Texas just reimposed the COVID-19 restrictions by closing the bars.

 

California was the first state that paused non-essential businesses and urged residents to stay at home in March. Gov. Gavin Newsom made plans for reopening restaurants, malls, and offices in California on May 12. In the last few weeks, however, the state reported the highest number of new cases and had more infected patients who needed to stay in hospitals. Counties with a high positivity rate of COVID-19 are urged to shut down again.

 

Other states, such as New York, New Jersey, and Connecticut, are imposing 14-day self-quarantine for travelers coming from the states with a “high-infection rate.” That is 10 infections per 100,000 people or 10% or higher positively rate over a seven-day rolling average. Currently, Alabama, Arizona, Arkansas, Florida, North Carolina, South Carolina, Texas, Utah, and Washington met such criteria.

 

Internationally, the European Union will soon decide if the U.S. can be included in the “safe list” of countries where residents can travel to the bloc without self-quarantine. The outlook now is not looking positive when many states still reported a high infected rate of COVID-19.

 

The glass is half full

 

On the flip side, there are hopes. First and for most, people want to travel. Key indicators are showing some signs of recovery.

 

More people are flying now than they were in April, according to the Transportation Security Administration (TSA), although the number of travelers could only account for one-fourth of the 2019 level. Airlines are also adding more domestic and international flights.

 

The hotel industry saw improvement as well, particularly in drive-to destinations and in the economy class hotels. Likewise, Airbnb observed a dramatic turnaround in June. Over the weekend of June 5 – June 7, Airbnb reported a first-time year-to-year growth since February.

 

The restaurant industry bounced back from the bottom, with better performance data in May. Sales in food services and drinking places increased by 29% to $38.6 billion.  

 

Will the vaccine be the solution?

 

Countries are racing for a remedy of COVID-19. Many are hoping the vaccine will become available by the end of this year.

 

Until then, some places are doing just fine without the vaccine. Taiwan, for example, relies on case tracing to bring down the infection rate. This year, Taiwan was one of the few places on this planet that could celebrate LGBTQ+ Pride with a public parade. Over 200 people gathered in the Liberty Square in Taipei this Sunday for the event.

 

Will travel be forever changed after the COVID-19 pandemic?

 

Without a doubt, travel will not be the same in the next few years. Travel companies are adapting to the new changes with enhanced cleaning standards and likely, with linear operations.

 

Nevertheless, when the pandemic is over and becomes history (let’s hope that will be the case very soon), will people still restrict themselves from going out? Will they want to wear masks in public? Will they practice social distancing?

 

What are your thoughts?


Note: This viewpoint is also available on MultiBriefs.com; The picture was downloaded from SmarterTravel.com

Comments

  1. We must adjust to this new reality. Tourism will never be the same, therefore developers must innovate or die.

    ReplyDelete
  2. The Covid-19 outbreak has had a serious impact on the global economy, and the tourism industry can be said to bear the brunt. Visa restrictions, flight suspensions, border closures, social distancing, and other measures have caused the global tourism industry to almost completely shut down. Travel-related service industries such as airlines, travel agencies, hotels, and attractions have entered an unprecedented period of Great Depression. As a result, the livelihoods of millions of tourism workers have been severely affected. I think that although travel restrictions and bans have been relaxed, travelers are still cautious about traveling due to continued health and safety concerns. Therefore, the recovery process of the tourism industry will be slow and long.
    Question: How long do you think the tourism industry will recover? Will the number of people traveling in the future increase or decrease?
    Sarah Zhao HRT3500-01

    ReplyDelete

Post a Comment

Popular posts from this blog

Yammer: A Social Networking Site Exclusively for the Workplace

Effective internal communications among employees are related to some desirable organizational outcomes, such as robust morale, a clear vision, low turnover, and high employee engagement. The question is what platform can serve the purpose. This ABC News video introduces “ Yammer ,” an exclusive internal communication tool for companies. A user must use a valid company e-mail address to sign up for an account. Once an account is validated, the user will be led to the company page that is pretty much like a Facebook page. The difference is that only the users whose e-mail addresses share the same domain can see the wall and communicate with each other. I have no question about whether Yammer could be a useful internal communication tool for companies, but I just wonder: how many social networking sites do people need for communication? Why people have to “create” so many platforms or channels for “effective communications”? To many people, Facebook is only for “friends,” whe

Can leisure and work-from-home demand stimulate extended-stay hotel growth beyond COVID-19?

The lodging industry is   struggling   to fill the empty rooms in 2020. For months, U.S. hotels are running at an occupancy of 50% or lower.     Not every segment   suffers the same impact from the pandemic, however. Demand for   home-sharing  facilities had already bounced back over the summer. Airbnb reported a higher booking than last year. Marriott’s home-sharing arm is also doing well, seeing a sevenfold increase in booking over last summer.     Similar to what a residential rental or home-sharing facility   offers , guestrooms in extended-stay hotels also feature a full-size kitchen or a kitchenette. Extended-stay hotels are designed for travelers who want to stay at a “home” when away from home. A guestroom at the Residence Inn Miami Sunny Isles Beach   Extended-stay hotels vs. home-sharing facilities     Because COVID-19 is primarily transmitted through direct or indirect human contacts, people are highly encouraged to avoid unnecessary human interactions, leading to more   con

Will restaurants of the future still need a dining room?

It does not seem the coronavirus is leaving us soon, although we have seen good   progress in developing the vaccine . In recent weeks, many places reported   a surge of new infected COVID-19 cases . Some even resumed   lockdowns   and the mask-mandate order, forcing restaurants to   shut down indoor dining   services again.     As a short-term remedy, restaurants immediately shifted their offering to   curbside pickup and delivery  services. Meanwhile, restaurants are testing new concepts to embrace the   contactless self-service  trend for the future. Here are some examples,     Chipotle opened its first digital-only restaurant     The new prototype, known as the   Chipotle Digital Kitchen , debut in Highland Falls, NY, earlier this month. Different from the traditional Chipotle restaurant, the Chipotle Digital Kitchen features:     A lobby designated for pickup services through off-premise orders.   A see-through kitchen, allowing customers to see, smell, and hear what is going on b