Skip to main content

“Travel, as we knew it, is over,” but there are hopes still

Airbnb co-founder Brian Chesky talked about the future of travel in a CNBC interview last week. He stated:


“Travel, as we knew it, is over. It doesn’t mean travel is over, just the travel we knew is over, and it’s never coming back. It’s just not.”


His statement made headlines last week, but he also suggested in the same interview:  

 

 “… travel is going to come back. It’s just going to take a lot longer than, you know, we would have thought, and it’s going to be different.”


What do you think? Will people travel again?


The glass is half empty

 

Some places saw a spark of confirmed infected cases of COVID-19 in just a few weeks after the local governments lifted the coronavirus restrictions. Florida, for example, reported that its daily case count had increased fivefold in just two weeks. Moreover, the median age of the new patients dropped to 36, indicating the coronavirus is now spreading among the younger age group.

 

Along with Florida, Texas and Arizona also reported record numbers of confirmed infected cases and emerged as the new epicenters. Arizona and Georgia recorded the highest number of new cases on Sunday. Texas just reimposed the COVID-19 restrictions by closing the bars.

 

California was the first state that paused non-essential businesses and urged residents to stay at home in March. Gov. Gavin Newsom made plans for reopening restaurants, malls, and offices in California on May 12. In the last few weeks, however, the state reported the highest number of new cases and had more infected patients who needed to stay in hospitals. Counties with a high positivity rate of COVID-19 are urged to shut down again.

 

Other states, such as New York, New Jersey, and Connecticut, are imposing 14-day self-quarantine for travelers coming from the states with a “high-infection rate.” That is 10 infections per 100,000 people or 10% or higher positively rate over a seven-day rolling average. Currently, Alabama, Arizona, Arkansas, Florida, North Carolina, South Carolina, Texas, Utah, and Washington met such criteria.

 

Internationally, the European Union will soon decide if the U.S. can be included in the “safe list” of countries where residents can travel to the bloc without self-quarantine. The outlook now is not looking positive when many states still reported a high infected rate of COVID-19.

 

The glass is half full

 

On the flip side, there are hopes. First and for most, people want to travel. Key indicators are showing some signs of recovery.

 

More people are flying now than they were in April, according to the Transportation Security Administration (TSA), although the number of travelers could only account for one-fourth of the 2019 level. Airlines are also adding more domestic and international flights.

 

The hotel industry saw improvement as well, particularly in drive-to destinations and in the economy class hotels. Likewise, Airbnb observed a dramatic turnaround in June. Over the weekend of June 5 – June 7, Airbnb reported a first-time year-to-year growth since February.

 

The restaurant industry bounced back from the bottom, with better performance data in May. Sales in food services and drinking places increased by 29% to $38.6 billion.  

 

Will the vaccine be the solution?

 

Countries are racing for a remedy of COVID-19. Many are hoping the vaccine will become available by the end of this year.

 

Until then, some places are doing just fine without the vaccine. Taiwan, for example, relies on case tracing to bring down the infection rate. This year, Taiwan was one of the few places on this planet that could celebrate LGBTQ+ Pride with a public parade. Over 200 people gathered in the Liberty Square in Taipei this Sunday for the event.

 

Will travel be forever changed after the COVID-19 pandemic?

 

Without a doubt, travel will not be the same in the next few years. Travel companies are adapting to the new changes with enhanced cleaning standards and likely, with linear operations.

 

Nevertheless, when the pandemic is over and becomes history (let’s hope that will be the case very soon), will people still restrict themselves from going out? Will they want to wear masks in public? Will they practice social distancing?

 

What are your thoughts?


Note: This viewpoint is also available on MultiBriefs.com; The picture was downloaded from SmarterTravel.com

Comments

  1. We must adjust to this new reality. Tourism will never be the same, therefore developers must innovate or die.

    ReplyDelete
  2. The Covid-19 outbreak has had a serious impact on the global economy, and the tourism industry can be said to bear the brunt. Visa restrictions, flight suspensions, border closures, social distancing, and other measures have caused the global tourism industry to almost completely shut down. Travel-related service industries such as airlines, travel agencies, hotels, and attractions have entered an unprecedented period of Great Depression. As a result, the livelihoods of millions of tourism workers have been severely affected. I think that although travel restrictions and bans have been relaxed, travelers are still cautious about traveling due to continued health and safety concerns. Therefore, the recovery process of the tourism industry will be slow and long.
    Question: How long do you think the tourism industry will recover? Will the number of people traveling in the future increase or decrease?
    Sarah Zhao HRT3500-01

    ReplyDelete

Post a Comment

Popular posts from this blog

Luxury vs. Millennials and Their Technology: The Ritz-Carlton (By Julia Shorr)

Embodying the finest luxury experience, The Ritz-Carlton Hotel Company, LLC has been established since 1983. In 1998, Marriott International purchased the brand offering it more opportunity for growth while being independently owned and operated. They are known for their enhanced service level as the motto states, “Ladies and Gentlemen serving Ladies and Gentlemen”. The luxury brand now carries 97 hotels and resorts internationally and is attempting to keep the aspects of luxury while keeping up with the trends of the technologically improving generations. The Varying Demographics of the Target Market The Ritz-Carlton’s typical target market includes: business executives, corporate, leisure travelers, typically middle-aged persons and elders, and families from the upper and upper-middle class section of society .   This infers a large range of types of travelers in which all are similar in that they are not opposed to spending extra for the luxurious ambiance. However, with

The challenges of SB 93 (California Senate Bill No. 93) will impose on the employers and their human resource management team (by Brittany Schaffer)

The COVID-19 pandemic started in early 2020, and it has caused massive changes within a short period of time. One of the most rememberable effects of the COVID-19 pandemic was that businesses had to come to a complete halt, forcing them to lay off employees. California's unemployment rates went up.  Now that the stay-at-home orders have lifted, people start to come out. Businesses are now reopening, looking to rehire their laid-off employees. Before the pandemic, employers had the option of recalling only a certain number of laid-off employees they would want to rehire based on employees' job performance. That option had been changed after Governor Gavin Newsome signed into law - Senate Bill 93, which went into effect on April 16th, 2021. The California Senate Bill No. 93 (SB 93) According to SB 93, companies in specific industries, mainly the hospitality industry, have the obligation to provide job opportunities in written form to qualified employees being laid off due to COVI

The complicated situation of tattoos in the workplace (by Harry Law)

Tattoos are a form of expression that convey the individuality of their owners. They can represent a multitude of things, like a tie to a family member, a favorite quote with a special meaning, or even a favorite cartoon character. Tattoos also can carry great cultural and/or religious significance. Every tattoo is unique and says something about the individual person who wears it. The problem that many companies face is when a tattoo is considered appropriate and when it should be covered.  Employees are after all the faces of a company, so the tattoos on their bodies are connected to and represent that company as well. Some workplaces have instituted rules and regulations when it comes to their employees’ tattoos, but there can be negative consequences when a company goes too far in telling their employees what they can and cannot do with their own bodies. The Disney Company has recently changed its policy on tattoos. Disney’s goal is to create a magical, fantasy experience for their