Skip to main content

Recommendations: HR Representatives should now wear four "masks"! (by Steven Valenzuela)


If there is one thing we know in a pandemic focused world, it is to social distance and to always wear a mask. However, as employees work from home and turn to video conferencing, perhaps the need to distance and wear a mask becomes irrelevant. For a post-pandemic human resources representative, this is not the case. Instead, they should not distance themselves at all; in fact, they should get closer to employees and wear four masks! 

Question: What is meant by this statement?

Answer: HR Representatives should socially distance but not relationally distance, all while wearing the masks of the four new roles they will play in an evolving business world: Program Developer, Movie Star, Orator, and Cultural Anthropologist. 

The Program Developer 
    
This redefined HR Representative role does not create new software; it creates new retention programs. Businesses that are looking to save money can start by keeping their employees from leaving the company, which ADP reports costing companies $1,886 per employee. Creating a solid, employee-satisfying retention program can be tricky, but it can be done. The pre-pandemic HR office had many concerns regarding child care and elderly care, in a pandemic or post-pandemic world childcare concerns still continue but in a different form. One cost-free recommendation is to set meetings outside of virtual school hours while a pricier option may be company discounts on childcare. Other popular retention programs include education programs similar to the ones offered by Disney (pricy) and Google (budget-friendly). This gives employees a sense of confidence for their future and satisfaction with their employer. Other areas to consider looking to when creating retention programs are pay rate and counseling services. 

The Movie Star 

You don’t need to be a good actor; you just need to look good on-screen. Whether it’s for a video interview, online onboarding, or a simple one-on-one video call, HR Representatives should be well lit, have good tone, project well, and should present themselves as a believable individual who is there for the employees every need. Forbes offers additional tips for successful video conferencing. Who said there was any acting involved? 

The Orator 

You don’t need to be the next Julius Caesar, you just need to be a decent storyteller who can tell the story of your company and how it has changed over time, especially through the pandemic. Talk about the culture that is developing and motivate them to be part of a new version of a successful business. Some prefer to be part of a new business venture anyway, so leading with a “we are all new to this version of the company” tone is probably your best bet if you want new employees to come in pumped and excited. Just one word of caution: beware the Ides of March! 

The Cultural Anthropologist 

Perhaps the hardest role the new HR Representative faces is not only being part of the newly developed company culture but also continuously studying it. With more people working from home and some companies reconsidering headquarter offices in leu of rented off-site spaces, it is important for the new representative to be there with the employees whether in a business zoom meeting or in an off-site location. It’s critical for HR Representatives to continue to do what they have always done, all while conducting research on the new culture of the company. This research can be used when creating onboarding and retention programs. The presence of HR in every capacity will be more crucial than ever; the last thing anyone needs is for their HR Representative to be an email that conveys no sense of personality, relationship, or connection to the company. Indeed, the best way to eliminate this is to be involved in-person whenever possible. Of course, when meeting in person, remember to social distance and always wear a mask. 

What new challenges have the pandemic brought to the HR functions? What recommendations will you make to the HR specialists to cope with those challenges? 

The Autor 
    
Steven Valenzuela is a senior at California State Polytechnic University Pomona. His experience in food and beverage has given him a deep knowledge of hotel food outlets, food trends, fine dining, beer, and wines. With over 15 years in the hospitality industry, he plans to utilize his Hospitality Management major in the areas of marketing and revenue management.

Comments

  1. Keeping your people safe and happy should be the HR department’s primary goal, but the new normal created by COVID-19 will also present certain operational challenges for many companies. One of these is ensuring there is sufficient capacity in your labour force for the business to get back to work and start generating revenue again. Read: are you ready to overcome HR challenges in the new normal?

    ReplyDelete

Post a Comment

Popular posts from this blog

Luxury vs. Millennials and Their Technology: The Ritz-Carlton (By Julia Shorr)

Embodying the finest luxury experience, The Ritz-Carlton Hotel Company, LLC has been established since 1983. In 1998, Marriott International purchased the brand offering it more opportunity for growth while being independently owned and operated. They are known for their enhanced service level as the motto states, “Ladies and Gentlemen serving Ladies and Gentlemen”. The luxury brand now carries 97 hotels and resorts internationally and is attempting to keep the aspects of luxury while keeping up with the trends of the technologically improving generations. The Varying Demographics of the Target Market The Ritz-Carlton’s typical target market includes: business executives, corporate, leisure travelers, typically middle-aged persons and elders, and families from the upper and upper-middle class section of society .   This infers a large range of types of travelers in which all are similar in that they are not opposed to spending extra for the luxurious ambiance. However, with

The challenges of SB 93 (California Senate Bill No. 93) will impose on the employers and their human resource management team (by Brittany Schaffer)

The COVID-19 pandemic started in early 2020, and it has caused massive changes within a short period of time. One of the most rememberable effects of the COVID-19 pandemic was that businesses had to come to a complete halt, forcing them to lay off employees. California's unemployment rates went up.  Now that the stay-at-home orders have lifted, people start to come out. Businesses are now reopening, looking to rehire their laid-off employees. Before the pandemic, employers had the option of recalling only a certain number of laid-off employees they would want to rehire based on employees' job performance. That option had been changed after Governor Gavin Newsome signed into law - Senate Bill 93, which went into effect on April 16th, 2021. The California Senate Bill No. 93 (SB 93) According to SB 93, companies in specific industries, mainly the hospitality industry, have the obligation to provide job opportunities in written form to qualified employees being laid off due to COVI

The complicated situation of tattoos in the workplace (by Harry Law)

Tattoos are a form of expression that convey the individuality of their owners. They can represent a multitude of things, like a tie to a family member, a favorite quote with a special meaning, or even a favorite cartoon character. Tattoos also can carry great cultural and/or religious significance. Every tattoo is unique and says something about the individual person who wears it. The problem that many companies face is when a tattoo is considered appropriate and when it should be covered.  Employees are after all the faces of a company, so the tattoos on their bodies are connected to and represent that company as well. Some workplaces have instituted rules and regulations when it comes to their employees’ tattoos, but there can be negative consequences when a company goes too far in telling their employees what they can and cannot do with their own bodies. The Disney Company has recently changed its policy on tattoos. Disney’s goal is to create a magical, fantasy experience for their