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Smartphone Etiquette

Many of us are obsessed with smartphones. However, not everyone knows how to respect others when using cell phones. I shared some news videos before about schools teaching teenagers how to properly use cell phones and people trying to live without smartphones. Now, let’s see what business professionals talk about smartphone etiquette. Here are some of their advices:
  • Do NOT text or read e-mails while you are in a conversation --- unless you want the other persons to know that they are not important to you.
  • Use spell check --- everything you send speaks for who you are as a person, even in text messages. 
  • Turn your phone on silence instead of vibrate --- people can still hear vibrates in a meeting. 
  • Do NOT look down and check your phones in a meeting or a conversation --- people can tell if you are paying attention to them; “it is also really rude and gives a terrible impression.” 
  • Do NOT leave long messages --- people prefer you to leave a brief messages with the reason of why you are calling; they will call you back and discuss with you in detail later (unless you do not leave them your number).
  • Do NOT leave someone on hold for an extended period of time --- people would rather you call them back later when you have a chance.  
  • Do NOT use ringback tone --- your mom and dad, and probably your friends as well, may find it cool, but it is very unprofessional.  
  • Do NOT talk in front of others --- you may excuse yourself. In some cases, you may pick up the phone and tell him/her that you are in the middle of something and will get back to him/her later.
  • Do NOT interrupt a face-to-face conversation --- no matter if you are texting, reading e-mails, checking updates, or just playing with your smartphones, people often find it rude and inappropriate.
Which behavior do you find the least tolerant? What other smartphone etiquettes do you recommend for us?

References:
American Express OPEN Forum: Top 9 Smartphone Etiquette Blunders 
Picture was downloaded from Blisstree.com.

Comments

  1. I believe this blog can help remind people in this century about how they can be more professional. In today’s society, almost everyone owns a cellphone and they became addicted to it without realizing. With their obsession of their phone, they will not notice how rude it could be to text message or go on the internet while having a conversion with a friend or even their co-workers. I am least tolerant when people take out their phone and check their text messages or replying back to a text message while I am talking to them. They will be nodding their heads pretending that they are paying attention to what I am saying but in fact they are just ignoring what I am saying. I think that behavior is highly unrespectful because when a person talks, I believe he or she would want full attention from others. As return, I would give my full attention to the speaker instead of checking my phone because I believe this is a type of manner that people in today’s society should be aware of.

    ReplyDelete
  2. The rate of cell phones usage among Americans is at an all time high. Every professional, babysitter, and even your grandmother use some form of wireless telecommunication.
    As a result of the development of the new smartphone has come to make a drastic changed from its original purpose. People have become so indulged in their phone it has beginning to take away from living their life in reality.
    It is becoming more common to see many people start conversations on their phone while already out with friend. These people get warped up into a phone conversation with seemingly easy and shows to be very disrespectful to others.
    Phone etiquette has been swiftly creeping up on Americans and we seem embarrassing it more and more.
    Although many people find it to be acceptable to talk and text all together at the same time, it can be said the knowledge of how to send proper text messages and emails seem to be increasing.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Alexa Sapper:

    Since the generation today is very obsessive with cell phones and technology, I think that this blog post has very important information that should always be remembered. To me, the least tolerant behavior that was discussed in this post has to be interrupting a face-to-face conversation. When I am in a conversation with someone and they check their phones and see that someone is calling them and they answer, it really bothers me. I make sure that whenever I am in a conversation with my friends or even my professors, I will never distract and check out my cell phone. The other behavior that similarly bothers me just as the face-to-face interruption is when people check their phones for texts or emails. It is very inconsiderate and makes it seem like the conversation that they are having is not as important as their email or text.

    ReplyDelete

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