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Social Media and Japan Earthquake

My heart goes out to those who experienced the devastating earthquake and tsunami in Japan, as well as those who suffered in a lower-magnitude earthquake in Southwest China. A huge natural disaster like this will certainly affect people’s lives, a place’s travel, tourism, and hospitality industry, and even a country’s economy (actually, everything!). Today, however, I would like to share a Fox News video and talk about how social media could be useful in helping human beings go through a disaster.
  • Japanese share pictures and updates on social media, keeping the global village informed with what is happening n Japan.  
  • People use Google People Finder to locate their relatives and friends in Japan.
  • People support one another and share their thoughts on social media.
  • Non-profit organizations raise money to help those in need on social media.
We have already been living in a very small world, but social media brings us even closer. I hope social media will help people speed up the recovery. While we are reaching out our hands and praying for the best, please share your experience and/or suggestions of helping others on social media.

Comments

  1. I already think social media is phenomenal when monitored and used in the right ways, it can land jobs, build relationships, or end the ones that should have ended long ago. This example from the earthquake and tsunami only further my belief that social media is not a fad it is a revolution that can only help us. The people finder amazes me the most and is a great tool especially where phone lines are down, wireless is not. Although the pictures are sad and devastating I think it will greatly help the red cross's efforts with their $10.00 text message campaign in raising funds to help those effected.

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  2. I believe social media is a great help to our community. It helped update the most recent news in Japan which could be a big help for people that have family members or friends in Japan. The Earthquake and tsunami is a disaster towards many people. But thanks to social media, it helped families find their relatives in Japan and even provided funds for them. Recently, I remember seeing several of my friends posting on Facebook asking people to donate money to organizations to help rescue Japan. Also I received many events relating to this disaster. Social Media helped everyone from all around the world be aware of what happening all over the world, even if it’s the other side of the globe. I believe social Media will help our economy grow and bring greater goods to our future.

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  3. The images and videos are truely heartbreaking- there was a recent programme on regarding the quake and how people are still trying to rebuild their lives. My best wishes go out to these people.

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