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Thanksgiving --- Let’s Thank Our Service Providers

What do you do in Thanksgiving? Eating a nice family meal? Shopping for bargains? …

I love those traditions, but quite often, “Thanksgiving” also reminds me the importance of showing genial appreciations to those who have done something nice to me in the past.
This CBS News video reminds us the same thing --- we need to be nice to waiters and waitresses. Servers in restaurants often receive very minimal hourly wage as they must count tips towards their incomes. Accordingly, it is important that we tip them 15-20% of the bill.

In addition to tips, showing genial appreciations can mean a lot to the service providers. For example, it is nice to maintain an eye contact with the servers while they take the orders, give them the attention when they place the food/drink on the table or remove the empty plates, and often, use words like “please” and “thank you.”
Being a good server is not easy. S/he must be very patient, possess good communication skills and multi-tasking skills, work long hours, deal with the wastes, and usually sacrifice weekends and holidays. So, the next time when we dine out, let’s show our appreciations to waiters and waitresses. Honestly, I believe that being nice to service providers and other people is also a very good indication of who we are as a person. Do you agree?

If you waited tables before, how would you describe “the best” and/or “the worst” customers you’ve ever served? 

Comments

  1. I personally found this article mentioned in your blog to be very important. Service providers also known as waiters and waitresses, like the video mentioned, are often not treated like people. Customers seem to forget that you are a paid server and not a servant. I've personally encountered situations where customers may snap their fingers at you and talk down to you as if you are a lower class than they are. Restaurant goers should absolutely always remember to treat their waiters with respect. You should always remember, the better you treat your waiter they better the waiter will treat you, and quality service makes for an overall more positive experience.

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  2. I also found this article to be very important. I am always reminded by my parents and even my peers to always tip 15% to 20% as service providers such as waiters and waitresses often receive below minimum wage and rely on their tips for a steady income. It is interesting that this article also mentions treating service providers with respect though as this is often forgotten unlike the 15%-20% tipping standard. We must always remember to treat our servers with respect and cognialty. This article is great because it shows both perspectives and it is true that the better you treat your server the more willing they are to treat you the same.

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  3. I'm happy this is what you chose as your Thanksgiving post, I think society sometimes doesn't realize that waiters are people just like them. I started working in a restaurant at an early age so I have been experiencing waiting on tables for several years. The best customers I have served have been nice, friendly and most importantly, understand human error. The worst are usually snobby, rude and don't have any comprehension of the restaurant business. I find that my experience waiting made me very conscientious when I am interacting with waiters or waitresses serving me. Therefore I always remember to be friendly, respectful, and tip at least fifteen percent.

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  4. I believe that waiter and waitress work need patient and communication skills. Good server satisfies customers and it upgrades quality of his or her restaurant.My friend started her first job as waitress and I found out her attitude changed toward waiter and waitress after her waitress work experience. She remembered her guests who were nice and friendly. Also, she reminded me that if I would like to receive best service, then be a best customer. I agree with her and I always try to show my appreciation to waiters and waitress.
    - Young Ju Choi

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  5. I strongly agree with this post and I believe that not many people take the suggestions you gave when dining at a restaurant. I work as a waitress at home over breaks at a local restaurant so I sympathize immensely with the CBS video. I used to get customers that refused to make eye contact with me and insisted on grumbling their orders. I would try to be as pleasant and friendly as possible to the customers but after so many one or two dollar tips you begin to get discouraged. Those customers that would return a smile, thank me for my efforts, and even engage in a friendly conversation were what got me through those days. Servers work very hard to make the customer happy and I like to think that now, when I go to a restaurant, I am one of those customers that helps make the servers day a little better.

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