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International Hotel, Motel + Restaurant Show 2011

This is the third time that I attended the International Hotel, Motel + Restaurant Show (Hotel Show) in New York City. While my schedule did not allow me to “explore” the new neighborhoods and trends in the City, I attended the Leadership Forum in the Hotel Show and the Alligator Hour hosted by CHRIE.

I did not find any “wow” factors or information that really surprised me in the Hotel Show. I, however, wrote down some notes taken in the Leadership Forum. If you attended or presented in the Hotel Show, let me know if you agree or disagree with me on the following:  
  • Overall, the statistics have shown signs of recovery based on ADR and occupancy, but the performance has not bounced back to the “peak” yet. Many uncertainties still exist (from a variety of sources).
  • Opportunities can be found in the university, military, and airport markets because they have captive customers.
  • There are several market “myths.” The truth include: income does not define segments; leisure, not business, drives the industry; there is a “clear cut” of business and leisure travelers; Boomers will not be completely replaced by Millennials; traditional reservation channels are still working.
  • Technology, especially “green technology,” is still a big focus of this year’s Hotel Show. I, however, did not hear anything unexpected.
  • Boutique hotel is still a big trend. As a matter of fact, Boutique Design New York also took place at the same time and in the same location as the Hotel Show did.

Overall, I liked this trip. I met many colleagues and the future industry leaders (students) in the Hotel Show and the Alligator Hour.

To check out the pictures I took in the Hotel Show, please visit (and Like) my Facebook Page.

Relevant discussion:
International Hotel, Motel + Restaurant Show 2010
Pictures taken in the Hotel Show of 2010

Selected Picture 1: MenuPad and Using Technology in Portion Control


Selected Picture 2: Mini Bar in Hotels

Comments

  1. With the exponential growth of technologies I'm surprised there werent any noticablly innovative products.
    However, the menu pad that you have depicted is something that I have only seen once or twice in the United States. On the contrary, I have seen the menu pad at least 10 different times when I have been outside the U.S. I have seen it in Canada, Italy, Spain and the Netherlands. I find this interesting and it makes me wonder how many new advancements go through Europe first before they get here?
    The menu pad is a really great innovation, as it makes paying with a credit card at restaurant much more easier. Not only does it make the server's job easier, it takes away from the wait for the customer to get theyre credit card back. It's a win-win product for both the customer and the restaurant.

    Ben Weber
    HPM 321

    ReplyDelete
  2. I agree with your mentioning of the "clear cut" between business and leisure guests in hotels. During my internship over the last couple summers, there were drastic changes from Monday-Thursday to Friday-Sunday. Despite the media and economy reports of declining income and unemployment, I found it hard to believe with a relatively small hotel in a Chicago-Suburb Hilton Hotel selling out almost every night.

    Also, with the whole "green" idea, I feel as though many hotels has adopted to the point where it just seems like the norm to do it. Motion sensors, recycling, and overall conservation are just some of the basic "expected" actions of businesses these days.

    Jessica Hwang
    HPM 314

    ReplyDelete

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