Skip to main content

2017 hotel trends: Some indications from AHLA 2016 Lodging Survey

Recently, the American Hotel and Lodging Association (AHLA) and Smith Travel Research (STR) released the "2016 Lodging Survey.The goal of this biennial survey is to provide a current and comprehensive understanding of hotel operations, with the possibility of identifying the critical travel trends heading into 2017.
The survey covers a wide range of areas. I highlighted the key findings from the survey on Multibriefs.com, but here is a brief summary:

Technology

#Hotel #Trends http://bit.ly/112216 
  • Almost all hotels across various chain scales (from luxury to economy hotels) adopt central reservation systems (94-100 percent).
  • More hotels are using mobile apps for customer service, including checking-in into a hotel. 
  • 98 percent of hotels offer high-speed in-room internet service with wireless access, with fewer hotels charging for the service. 
  • Fewer hotels are using social networking sites for marketing purposes, dropping from 93 percent in 2014 to 87 percent in 2016.
Additional discussions for consideration:

Sustainability

  • A substantial increase in the number of hotels using high-efficiency/LED lighting.
  • 94 percent of hotels offer a towel/linen reuse program.
  • 47 percent of hotels participate in an amenity-recycling program.
  • A record number is set by the hotels using energy management sensors in rooms.
Additional discussions for consideration:

In-room amenities

  • A downward trend shows fewer hotels are offering shower-only rooms.
  • Only 10 percent use shower shampoo/conditioner dispensers.

Guest services

  • 85 percent of hotels that are located at an airport location provide complimentary airport shuttle service.
  • 62 percent of hotels offer complimentary breakfast — 80 percent among upper-midscale hotels, 96 percent among midscale hotels and 81 percent among economy hotels.
  • The percentage of hotels that provide room service dropped to 22 percent, but at the same, 21 percent offer alternatives to traditional room service.
  • 34 percent of hotels charge a fee for checking out one or more days early.
Additional discussions for consideration:

Property offering

  • 55 percent of luxury hotels and 25 percent of independent hotels have music/entertainment/nightclubs, much higher than other categories.
  • Large meeting space (over 10,000 square feet) is usually found in luxury, upper-upscale and independent hotels.
  • More hotels are offering free parking service, increasing from 72 percent in the previous survey to 85 percent this year.
Additional discussions for consideration:

Safety and security

  • 86 percent of hotels installed surveillance cameras in the lobby, the highest number ever.
  • Additional discussions for consideration:
Will you be able to see the 2017 hotel trends from this report? Please share your thoughts with us, as I share mine under "additional discussions for consideration."

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

Yammer: A Social Networking Site Exclusively for the Workplace

Effective internal communications among employees are related to some desirable organizational outcomes, such as robust morale, a clear vision, low turnover, and high employee engagement. The question is what platform can serve the purpose. This ABC News video introduces “ Yammer ,” an exclusive internal communication tool for companies. A user must use a valid company e-mail address to sign up for an account. Once an account is validated, the user will be led to the company page that is pretty much like a Facebook page. The difference is that only the users whose e-mail addresses share the same domain can see the wall and communicate with each other. I have no question about whether Yammer could be a useful internal communication tool for companies, but I just wonder: how many social networking sites do people need for communication? Why people have to “create” so many platforms or channels for “effective communications”? To many people, Facebook is only for “friends,” whe

Can leisure and work-from-home demand stimulate extended-stay hotel growth beyond COVID-19?

The lodging industry is   struggling   to fill the empty rooms in 2020. For months, U.S. hotels are running at an occupancy of 50% or lower.     Not every segment   suffers the same impact from the pandemic, however. Demand for   home-sharing  facilities had already bounced back over the summer. Airbnb reported a higher booking than last year. Marriott’s home-sharing arm is also doing well, seeing a sevenfold increase in booking over last summer.     Similar to what a residential rental or home-sharing facility   offers , guestrooms in extended-stay hotels also feature a full-size kitchen or a kitchenette. Extended-stay hotels are designed for travelers who want to stay at a “home” when away from home. A guestroom at the Residence Inn Miami Sunny Isles Beach   Extended-stay hotels vs. home-sharing facilities     Because COVID-19 is primarily transmitted through direct or indirect human contacts, people are highly encouraged to avoid unnecessary human interactions, leading to more   con

Will restaurants of the future still need a dining room?

It does not seem the coronavirus is leaving us soon, although we have seen good   progress in developing the vaccine . In recent weeks, many places reported   a surge of new infected COVID-19 cases . Some even resumed   lockdowns   and the mask-mandate order, forcing restaurants to   shut down indoor dining   services again.     As a short-term remedy, restaurants immediately shifted their offering to   curbside pickup and delivery  services. Meanwhile, restaurants are testing new concepts to embrace the   contactless self-service  trend for the future. Here are some examples,     Chipotle opened its first digital-only restaurant     The new prototype, known as the   Chipotle Digital Kitchen , debut in Highland Falls, NY, earlier this month. Different from the traditional Chipotle restaurant, the Chipotle Digital Kitchen features:     A lobby designated for pickup services through off-premise orders.   A see-through kitchen, allowing customers to see, smell, and hear what is going on b