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Landing the Next Job while Playing Games Online

People often feel nervous and stressful about job search because it takes a long time and plenty of energy. Would it sound better if people can land their next jobs by playing video games online?

This ABCNews video introduced a new way of job search for technology professionals --- playing games at http://www.gild.com/. The idea behind GILD is to offer members opportunities to participate in a variety of competitions (games). By winning competitions, members can (a) win prizes, (b) show off their skills, (c) gain confidence, and (d) make themselves known within the network. GILD works for both active and passive job seekers. In the future, it is possible that this job-search tactic can apply to other professions, such as finance, accounting, and other functional areas. Harrah's, now Caesars Entertainment, is an employer who uses GILD. Other hospitality companies might follow.

Besides networking, using social media for job search is also about showing off a person’s authentic professional skills and making their qualifications visible to potential employers. If people do not want to play games, they can still demonstrate their strengths with a good cover letter and resume or by actively sharing their professional thoughts and ideas in online forums. As an employer, how do you like this idea of bring games to the recruitment-selection process? If you are a job seeker, do you think playing video games will help you find a job? In what way?


 
Interested in watching more videos about GILD? You may check out another interview of a GILD user (employer) at ABCNEWS.com via http://soc.li/m5pqjcG.

Comments

  1. I visited Gild’s website to find out more about the competition. Although it has some descriptions about each game, I do not know what to expect before getting into the competition. It is a new way to find jobs for job seekers and I think it is good to have something new other than the traditional process. It is especially useful for those who have skills and knowledge but have trouble marketing themselves during interviews. However, Gild needs to prove that individuals who win the game have credibility and capability to success in workplace. In addition, the game’s content is being accurately designed to show the participates’ skill and knowledge. Overall, I think having these certifications is just extra information for employers that a job candidate has some understandings about the industry. Employers should not hire someone just because he/she won the competition.

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