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The Power of Twitter Complaints

When I had a complaint, I often went to managers because I believed they were empowered to do “whatever they can” to satisfy me. This is not the case anymore. The most attention a person can get is to complain on Facebook or Twitter. In June, we discussed why hotel guests need to complain via social media. In September, we shared a relevant news article about how much attention restaurants pay to those complaints found on Facebook or Twitter. Today, I am going share another Wall Street news video about how travelers may get better results from their complaints about airlines --- people might have received a “NO” from a real person on the phone, but they got a “YES” after they tweeted. Did you have similar experience? Now that you know the trick, what will you do the next time when you experience a problem?

Comments

  1. The whole "social network" trend has been getting bigger and bigger throughout the last couple of years. I really don't understand how a customer can call or physically approach a company with a compliant and get one answer and then "tweet" and get an entirely different response. Pretty soon people will stop complaining to the actual company and just use whatever social network is available to vent their frustrations. Not only is this a common factor in customer/company relations but also with sports. Many different sports have fined players for "unlawful" tweets.

    - Willie Williams

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  2. Seldom do I encounter a problem, whether it is with an airline, or another business entirely, that I cannot solve with the proper complaint through the proper channels. However, with that being said, I can see how it is easy to say no to a complaint in person, but much more difficult to ignore one that is broadcast to the world. Companies need to realize that their public image and reputation could slowly be destroyed over comments on facebook and twitter. While I do have a twitter account, I use it for more personal reasons than professional. However, at this point, I think that threatening to a manager to ‘tweet’ about an issue may be enough to render the desired outcome you are looking for.

    Philip L. Schanck

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