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Can a Tough Cell Phone Policy Teach Teenagers Cell Phone Etiquette?

Cell phone is no doubt an important tool for communications. However, it is inappropriate and sometimes rude if one uses cell phones during class, meetings, seminars, business lunch, a date, job interviews, or other functions that needs the person’s attention. Since schools are the places where future leaders are educated, should schools teach students good cell phone etiquette by enforcing a tough cell phone policy? When I say “tough,” I mean locking up the cell phones for up to ONE YEAR for those repeat offenders. If a student refuses to turn in his/her cell phone, s/he could be suspended from schools.

Does it sound crazy? This Fox News video reports that a high school in Bay Area (California) is taking the “tough” approach I mentioned above. Those who support this policy believe that schools need to teach students the consequences of their behaviors. If a school has a policy but fails to enforce the rules, students will not learn anything.

If you are a manager, what is the cell phone policy in your work place? How do your company and you enforce the policy? If you are against such a cell phone policy, what other methods can be used to teach students cell phone etiquette?

Comments

  1. When I was in high school the policy was if it is seen in class the teacher may take it until the end of the day. At that point you could pick it up. I don't feel that a tough policy against cell phone use is fair or necessary. Considering that our whole way of life is changing in the sense that constant socialization and networking is at the core of this decade and I'm sure of the decades that follow. It's just a way of life and school are going to have to accept it. No way should a school have that much power to take a phone away for a year, that's boarder line illegal, schools have WAY to much authority, but that's a different rant. If they really wanted to fix the problem here's a good solution. Invent a signal blocking device that goes into the class room so no one has service. Problem solved.

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  2. Maybe in the future, all classes will be delivered with cell phone devices or something like Podcasting. Then, students shall be able to do "multi-tasking" as they wish --- texting, browsing the Internet, or even talking with their cell phones while checking out class lectures or learning through Podcasting. But before the future arrives, what shall we do?

    If students were allowed to use any cell phones for anything in class as they wish, considering that we are living in America, the land of freedom, shall professors be also allowed to text, talk, or browse the Internet with their cell phones while teaching a class or speaking to students? How would you feel if your professors pay more attention to their cell phones than you while you are in class or trying to talk to the professors, Phil Spinelli?

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  3. I do not think schools have the right to take a students cell phone away for up to a year. That punishment sounds silly and ludicrous to me. I interpret that as theft. The school is taking a product that you bought and pay a monthly fee on and holding it for a year. That is ridiculous. I went to a high school where they tried implementing these new cell phone rules like holding it for a night and one Friday in lunch, during our leisure time, I was caught on my cell phone and they tried to take my phone for the weekend. Well after long debate we agreed I could get my phone after class. I think students should be allowed to use their cell phones during lunch and off periods, but should not use their phones during class time. I think a good punishment for being caught using your phone during class is it initially gets taken for the remainder of the school day and repeat offenders should receive detentions.

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