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Community-Supported Agriculture (CSA) for Restaurants

I like the CSA idea in Pennsylvania. A family pays $500 a season for weekly delivery of fresh produce. Then, the family is guaranteed to have fresh vegetables and sometimes fruits. Eating fresh and supporting local farmers are the biggest advantages. The challenge, however, is that the family cook has to be very creative because the kind of vegetable and the amount of produce being delivered may vary every week according to the weather conditions.

I see the potential of applying this CSA idea to independent restaurants. Well, if an urban restaurant can count on its rooftop garden for greens, why can’t an independent restaurant reply on local farmers? In fact, growing vegetables on one’s own has become the hottest restaurant trend of the year. By using local ingredients, talented chefs can show off their creative culinary arts skills; an independent restaurant may also find a niche to “distinguish” itself from other restaurant chains.

What do you think of this CSA idea in restaurant business? If local ingredients are used, what measures will you use to control the quality of food? As a consumer, will you prefer to eat in a local restaurant where you find unfamiliar menu items? Or would you rather eat in a restaurant chain that serves you a standardized menu? Why?

Comments

  1. I think it would be a nice idea. For purchasing products, good quality always comes first than price. Even if A product in better quality costs more than B, the restaurant should go for product A because it serves to customers.
    For CSA, if it costs not too high and the quality is great and fresh then there is no reason not to accept CSA to purchase items in restaurant industry.
    As a consumer, I would rather eat in a restaurant chain that serves a standardized menu because it is a bit cumbersome to go to other local restaurants to try unfamiliar menu even if it is much healthier and fresh. It is not easy to change things that once used to for quite a long time.

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  2. For an independent rFor an independent restaurants to “find a niche to 'distinguish' itself from other restaurant chains” would probably require a lot more work for their business. The CSI is a wonderful idea but it would be more work on top of the work load the business has already. To take care of a rooftop farm is a very interesting idea, I would like to try that to but that would require more labor, more care in each vegetable they plan to grow. Not only would it require more care, it would require more round the clock watch since in the city, for a rooftop farm, mice would be a factor to take into consideration. A rooftop garden would be wonderful in a suburban area but definitely not for an urban restaurant. estaurant to

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  3. CSA seems to have a good idea, the only problem is how will most people react to it. When people enter a restaurant it generally is for a reason, they want a good meal, they have heard good reviews, or the ingredients are so fresh and tasteful. On one hand you can say if a product is "better quality" then see you should spend the extra money as you owe it to your customer. On the other hand if you already have a nice restaurant with a broad cliental there is no reason to start changing things around now. " If it aint broke don't fix it" Me being a consumer walking into a restaurant would try a new item on the menu if it says fresh grown ingredients. From the restaurants perspective it would be rather expensive to start purchasing fresh goods from new suppliers. Overall even though the CSA seems to have a good idea, I think it still needs more time to be developed and in the end only certain restaurants would want to adopt this "Fresh Food Plan"
    Matthew B

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