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A Better Way to Pour Beer: Filling a Cup from the Bottom Up

This ABC News video shows us a new and definitely-better way to poor beer --- filling a cup from the bottom up. Yes, I am saying “from the bottom up.”

It works because of an innovative technology. The secret comes from the cup, which has a tiny hole on the bottom and works with a magnet. When the cup is filled with beer, the magnet will move back to its place (and stops the leak). What does this new beer-pouring method mean to business?
  1. With this technology, beer is poured nine (9) times faster than using a tap.
  2. This technology ensures “perfect” portion and quality control, even the beer foam looks the same in every cup.
  3. This technology also makes managing beer inventory much easier when everything is perfectly controlled.
What a cool technology! I wonder how much the start-up and variable costs are. What other new innovations are currently used in the hospitality industry? How do these innovations impact the bottom line of a business operation?

Comments

  1. When I saw this video in class this morning I was very impressed, but surprised that it took this long to come up with this type of innovation. It looks like a great tool for places that serve a lot of beer. Although the technology would save the business some money (from the decrease in spillage loss), I wonder how much money the machine and the special cups cost, and if this cost would offset the money saved.
    I read an article by Greg Mathias on his experience at the hotel industry's annual technology conference. The focused on many of the wireless innovations making their way into the hospitality industry. One new innovation I found interesting was a security tool created by "OpenWays". With this technology a guest re-registers with the hotel and their room number is sent to them through a text message. When they arrive at their room they put the earpiece of their handset up to the "OpenWays" adapter on the door lock. A tone is transmitted that allows entrance into the room. Although technology flaws might cause problems until the system is perfected, this seems like a great opportunity for people who want or need to avoid long lines at the front desk.

    -Katie Oja

    source:http://www.networkworld.com/community/blog/cool-wireless-innovations-hospitality-industr

    ReplyDelete
  2. When I first saw this new invention I was pretty well amazed. The fact that someone came up with the idea to literally pour beer from the bottoms up I thought was ingenious. This technology if adapted by a business would not only standardize the beer they sell, but I feel would also be able to attract a lot of business based off of the fact that there is a new exciting technology. I could see many people flocking to the business just to see the item work first hand. I decided to look into the product more and discovered that it was made through a manufacturer called GrinOn Industries. They also allow businesses to put a custom logo onto the cups, as well as offer multiple sizes of cups to use. As the site says, larger sizes are available upon request and Pitchers to pour in just became available at the end of last year. This technology has been able to beat the world record for beer pouring as well. (now at 44 pints per minute with one person, beating 36 pints per minute). Ironically the record they broke, was a record they had created. It seems that this innovative company just keeps outdoing themselves.

    -Carrie Strout

    Site:
    http://www.grinonindustries.com/dispensers.htm

    ReplyDelete
  3. Thank you very much for sharing an update, Carrie. Many companies can survive in competitions because they never give up finding news methods of improvement. We should do the same to ourselves as well. We all need to keep up the good work.

    ReplyDelete
  4. 9 times faster than a traditional tap? That’s impressive. It would definitely do wonders at a frat party.

    I wouldn’t be surprised if this type of technology shortly becomes the new form of beer dispensing at all major sports arenas and concert halls. Not only is it new and appealing, but it is also extremely efficient. It can fill up multiple cups at once in less than five seconds, id like to see a standard tap do that. This device also creates a lot less foam than a traditional tap and since its served from the bottom up, there is less chance of creating a mess. The Bottoms Up beer dispenser definitely has the potential to revolutionize the way beer is served at major events with a lot of people and long lines.
    I don’t really see this becoming too popular at bars and restaurants because it mostly seems like it was created for serving hundreds/ thousands at once. Regardless how/why this device is used, I am sure we will begin to see the Bottoms Up beer dispenser in more and more hospitality operations as time goes by. I think this invention is genius, the names perfect to!

    - Eric G Hernandez

    ReplyDelete

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