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The Cosmopolitan of Las Vegas: A Chic Hotel that Offers Total Guest Experience

This ABC News video takes us to a tour of The Cosmopolitan of Las Vegas, a mega hotel and casino that was just opened in a wave when Las Vegas is trying to re-position or re-define itself as a tourist destination. In many ways, The Cosmopolitan affirms several trends of the hospitality industry.

First and for most, The Cosmopolitan shows that the boutique-design concept can also work in a mega hotel. The post-modern gallery-like lobby, the glamorous chandelier lighting, and those designer boutique stores put a big fashion statement on this hotel.

Second, The Cosmopolitan targets those “curious class” travelers, which compose of 59 million Americans. This group “enjoys travel.” They are “open-minded.” They “like adventures.” They like to “explore.” They “enjoy foreign food.” And they “like interesting hotel concepts.”

Third, F&B (food and beverage) are very important in hotels because they contribute a big portion of a hotel’s revenues. As a high-end hotel, The Cosmopolitan has a “rock star” chef and more than one first-class restaurant.

Last but not least, The Cosmopolitan is selling a total guest experience. The hotel presents “arts” in a variety of ways, from construction, design, decors, food, boutique shops, and clubs. The ultimate goal of the hotel is to leave every guest a smile after his/her stay.

Because The Cosmopolitan is a brand new hotel that was built from the ground up, it may seem easier to adopt the new changes and trends as compared to those hotels that have been in business for a while. What are the hospitality trends you see lately? If you are a manager of a hotel or restaurant that has been opened for business for years, what opportunities and threats do you face when new trends emerge? How can you incorporate the new trends to your existing business operations?



References:
Picture was downloaded from http://www.homesparadise.com/ via http://tinyurl.com/linchikwok01252011P

Comments

  1. The Cosmopolitan seems to be a very creative and interesting hotel. It looks absolutely beautiful and fancy. I believe that this hotel is definitely one of the best hotels I've ever seen in media. Some hospitality trends I've seen lately are nothing as upgraded and fancy as this. Competition and challenges would definitely be faced by other hotel/restaurant managers. Less customers means less money so that's another problem that may be encountered for the managers. Also because of the competition, more money may have to be spent as well to upgrade the hotel to be just as fancy and attractive. I would really like to be a customer for Cosmopolitan of Las Vegas some day. Everything looks so gorgeous and amazing. It would be nice to have more of these kind of hotels around the world but also expensive.

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  2. Although the Cosmopolitan seems like a great property it might struggle to gain success. The property has nice aspects like the "rock star" chef, multiple restaurants, shops, a club, and a theme that is well supported by it's decor, but these are things that are found in many, if not all, of the large properties along the Las Vegas Strip. In my experience people usually choose a hotel that they have previous experience with or that they have heard good things about. It is important that The Cosmopolitan makes itself well known and provides its guests with a great first experience so it can begin to compete with the other large properties in Las Vegas that already have good reputations.

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  3. I love one more new trend of hospitality industry is shown in Cosmopolitan. As Susan, Katie mentioned above, they have a great and creative direction to develop their vision. My question would also be similar with Katie. Will they be able to keep up the competition. I found the "rock star" chef the most specialized point for Cosmopolitan. I really wonder what other internal strategy (in comparison with how much expenditure Cosmopolitan has to spent) for them to keep up & balance every aspect of the hotel.

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  4. The food and beverage are pretty much what matters to me. That is the only difference with a rented apartment. Hotels are fine, but when I made my argentina travel I wanted to stay for a while so I decided to rent. We had a first-class restaurant near our building, so we ate the best food every day!

    ReplyDelete
  5. A relevant discussion in LA Times: Cosmopolitan of Las Vegas offers boutique on a grand scale
    http://www.latimes.com/travel/destinations/west/la-tr-cosmo-20110130,0,5405076.story

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  6. For a follow-up: Cosmopolitan is no profit track
    http://www.lasvegassun.com/news/2011/mar/30/cosmopolitan-owner-expects-recover-investment-reso/

    ReplyDelete
  7. Andrew Warner HPM 314
    The Cosmopolitan looks like it has started a new trend in the hospitality business around Las Vegas. Beautifully decorated, different themes, a huge chandlier that people can walk in and have rock star chefs cook for them. It is definately geared toward the well to do travelers who are traveling without their family. A very interesting concept and in Vegas anything is possible. Money though, that is huge money to keep going. If the economy keeps improving they could be starting a new trend in Vegas.

    ReplyDelete
  8. It's really informative blog post. I love it..Thanks for sharing it dear.

    Human Resource Management

    ReplyDelete

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