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Carry-On Luggage: The ONLY Thing that a Job Candidate Should Carry during an On-Site Job Interview

If a candidate passes the first or second interview, s/he may receive an invitation from a potential employer to conduct an on-site job interview in a corporate location. This interview is crucial because the candidate will meet with all decision makers in an organization and often, a hiring decision will be made after this on-site interview. Then, what should a job candidate prepare for this on-site job interview? The very basic rule is: never check in any luggage for this trip!

Yes, a candidate must minimize the possibility of losing a check-in luggage on a trip for job interviews --- imagine what a nervous job candidate would react after s/he finds out the luggage was lost in some airports. Even if the check-in luggage arrives safely at the final destination on time, what first impression does a candidate make to the hiring manager by checking in luggage? Does the hiring manager want to wait with a job candidate in the airport for check-in luggage? What would the hiring manager think if s/he sees a candidate packs big luggage for a one-or-two-day trip?

My advice is that job candidates must pack light and make sure that they only have carry-on luggage. In addition to the 21”×14”×9”, 40lb rule for carry-on luggage and the 3oz and quart-size Ziploc bag rule for liquids, the embedded Fox News video shows us some tips of how to pack carry-on luggage. If a candidate must check-in a luggage, I would suggest them to plan ahead and ship the must-have-but-cannot-carry items via FedEx or UPS to the destination. Or even easier, just buy those items in the destination. Still, nothing is more secured than bringing every must-have items in carry-on luggage. Do you agree? What other suggestions do you have?

Comments

  1. A job interview can be very nerve wracking and is the "make or break" factor of whether a person gets the job or not. First impression is everything. In order to make a positive impression, the person being interviewed should appear composed, friendly, and confident.

    Whether a person is flying across the country or just an hour plane ride for a job interview, he or she must plan accordingly. There are many instances where luggage is misplaced or lost, and this could ruin the entire interview. For example, the person could be extremely late for the interview, or there clothes could be lost in the luggage. In order to prevent this from happening, people should book flights so that they will not be rushed and have to worry about whether or not they will make good timing. In addition, people should carry they're clothes and folder that contains they're resume and other important things that are needed in they're carry on bag. This way, in case the luggage does get misplaced, they still have what they need and can handle the issue once the interview is over.

    However, if this were to happen, a person cannot show emotional distress and let it take a big effect on how they present themselves during an interview.

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  2. Riana Bauman

    While going on an interview to meet someone at a company it can be very intimating. First impression ALWAYS matters. Depends on what you wear, how you look, what you are carrying. You do not want to be over the end. Going away for a weekend for a job interview, I do feel that the person should have their outfit all picked out and be prepared. You should ONLY bring a carry-on. Why would you want to carry this entire luggage for 1 or 2 days? You should pack lightly and with the necessary items that you need. Most importantly you resume must be with you. You must be very organized and have everything all planned out.

    I do agree that nothing is more secured than bringing a carry-on luggage. Why would you want to wait for your luggage at the carrier? What if the flight comes in late and you have to be somewhere? Always be prepared!

    Other suggestions that I do have are pack lightly, be prepared, stay on task and most importantly breathe! Even though it is an interview that can make or break your day, be yourself!

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  3. Interviews for a job or internship opportunity can be very nerve racking. People tend to worry about what to wear and what they will need for the interview. Often times people have to travel a far distance via a plane to get to the interview and this can cause extra stress and anxiety because people may not know what to pack.

    I agree that it is very important to pack light. One should already have a planned outfit to wear prior to the trip and then pack small toiletries and other essentials. It is not neccesarry to over pack, bring tons of outfit options and check your luggage. By overpacking and checking your luggage could cause extra stress and in the long run ruin the internship. The person could be worrying about which outfit to wear and hoping that their luggage is in the airport when they arrive if they check their luggage which causes one to not have the opportunity to relax and prepare for the interview on the plane.

    The best advice I have for interviews would be to pack light, relax, be confident and be yourself. Also it is important to be prepared, but if you act confident it can really help.

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