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Social Media Etiquette for Business

Seeing that social media has become an inseparable part of people’s lives, this ABC News video discusses some social media etiquette for business. Business is advised to pay attention to the “3Ds” --- Disclosure, Defamation, and Discrimination --- where disclosure is referred to the ways of protecting trade secrets as well as intellectual properties or posting advertisements on social networking sites without a disclosure statement; defamation is about making a false statement about a person or a business; and discrimination means all protected classes under current laws and regulations are also protected on social networking sites. In particular, this video outlines seven suggestions for business owners:
  1. Let employees know that you have the right to monitor their social media activities
  2. Limit employees’ access to social media sites
  3. Require prior approval for postings related to a company
  4. Set parameters of making friends between co-workers on social media sites
  5. Limit time spent on social media sites
  6. Give examples of specific violations
  7. Spell out consequences for violations and enforce them
In this blog, we also discussed the importance of setting up a social media policy in workplace. How important is social media policy in today’s business? What social media activities are considered appropriate? What social media activities are NOT? What provisions should be included in a social media policy?

Comments

  1. Social Media has become the new form of communication because of this its importance in todays business is so high. Like anything you would send over the Internet you have to be aware of the masses that can see each blog, tweet, facebook post or other form of message projected on a social network site. I think much of what is not appropriate is common scene but should be reviewed by all company’s that are concerned about the information that could possibly be visible for anyone’s eyes to see. The activities I would say are not appropriate would be leaking information that would but a company’s name in danger or information that should be kept confidential as well as pictures that are personal. A social media policy should be very detailed and include everything a company would feel uncomfortable if it was presented in any form through any website. If I was personally making a social media policy I would have anyone who was going to use the company’s name or refer to the company check with someone in higher power to ensure it was safe.

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