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A Continuous Discussion on Urban Farming: A New Wave of Agricultural Revolution?

The Industrial Revolution had both positive and negative impacts on the society and the environments. While civilization allows people to enjoy a better life, the revolution may also have destroyed the harmony relationship between human beings and the Mother Nature in some degrees. Over the years, we have learned many lessons as our society continues to evolve. Sustainability becomes one of the focal points when people redefine a healthy life style.

Urban farming is one of those sustainable issues that have brought to my attention. I have shared my thoughts on this topic many times on this blog. Today, I am going to share an additional CNN News video on how urban farming can transform an abandon industrial zone in Brooklyn, NY. Based on what you see in the video and my previous discussions, what entrepreneurship opportunities do you find? What suggestions will you give to hotel or restaurant owners for running a more sustainable business? Will you see the urban farming concept the beginning of a new wave of Agriculture Revolution? Why or why not?

Relevant Discussions:
A Five-Star Hotel Adopts the Rooftop Gardening Concept
Restaurant Trend of Growing One’s Own Vegetables
Community-Support Agriculture
Rooftop Gardening

Comments

  1. Urban farming is certainly the beginning of a new wave of agricultural innovation. At the present it is a trendy, but alternative method of food procurement. As with any inventive or new operation concept there is great potential for urban farming to be a lucrative entrepreneurial investment for those who realize the opportunity. However, what is more important than potentially successful investment opportunity, is the future of food procurement and consumption.

    The current food market is not sustainable, food being consumed in one location may have traveled anywhere from 20-2,000 miles, from farm to plate. Rising oil prices, government subsidies of cash crops and large food company monopolies are going to cause an implosion of the food market as resources become more scarce. An immediate progression towards localization will greatly decrease the detrimental effects of any type of crisis.

    Restaurants that proactively make their menu's more local and sustainable will profit both in the short term and the long term. Going as far as growing their own food is a big commitment and requires a substantial initial investment, that mat not currently appeal to many establishments. Also, it would be very difficult for a single restaurant or urban farm to successfully yield all of the produce a chef, that is accustomed to the variety and selection the current food market provides, demands.

    A solution to these situations may be the development of restaurant urban food co-ops. Co-ops exist in most suburbs, and some cities and are a trendy and eco-friendly way to get seasonal vegetables. The co-op concept could be applied to restaurant procurement. An urban farm could offer a membership to restaurants that provides them with bi-weekly deliveries of fresh, local produce. The member ship cost could be reduced if restaurant employees participate in the work required of the farm. This would promote sustainability and educate at the same time.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Thank you for providing an insightful discussion. Let me know if you want to pursue urban farming as an entrepreneurship idea. As a Kauffman Professor, I am eager to help entrepreneurs in our college. Hospitality is a great industry for entrepreneurs.

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