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One Has No Choice But to Manage His/Her Online Image

I agree with the mainstream media that people, especially job seekers, must manage their image on social media. This ABC News video, once again, reinforces this idea, but what’s new in this video?
  • 80% recruiters looked up candidates online, and 80% of them had denied job candidates based on what they found online, which is higher than what I stated in my previous discussions.  
  • Recruiters are looking for “person-organization” and “person-job” fit from a candidate’s online profile, which does not sound new to me but is a very important point.  
  • The screening process on social media takes place even before interviewing, which is way earlier than what I talked about (e.g. at the background check stage).  
The bottom line is --- if a job seeker wants to get a job, s/he must “look sharp” all the time --- online or on the spot (i.e. job interviews). Now, we have no choice but to manage our online reputation; and we had better do it well. Do you pay attention to your online reputation? How do you manage it? What suggestions do you have in managing a person’s online reputation?

Some Relevant Posts:
Background Check on Social Media: Now Is a Serious Business
Using Facebook for Background Check
Social Media and Job Search I
Social Media and Job Search II
Social Media and Job Search III
Personal Brand and Social Media
Managing Your Online Reputation
Ways to Clean Up a Person’s Negative Online Reputation

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Comments

  1. Social media can be a great tool for connecting people across vast geographic areas. There are many other benefits as well, such as keeping in contact with friends, notifying family members of an upcoming event, and much more. However, there is a counteracting side to the numerous benefits of social networking. Some people are simply not smart about what they choose to share over the internet. There have been cases when I have seen pictures or posts from people I know when I can’t help but think : What were they thinking when they chose to share this? Potential employers, friends, teachers, and anyone else hold the ability to quickly type in your name and find results. It is your responsibility to make your page look professional, tasteful, and something to be respected. I keep my profile as private as possible mainly for safety reasons. I am friends with my relatives and other adults who respect me and know that I have nothing to hide when it comes to sharing material online, nor would I ever post something inappropriate. Anyone using social media should use common sense when it comes to online etiquette and expectations.

    -Lindsey LaDue, NSD 314

    ReplyDelete
  2. Kelsey Conn NSD 314September 7, 2011 at 8:26 PM

    This video really has me thinking. I am fully aware that many potential employers check social media sites, such as facebook. My friend graduated from Penn State this year and thought he had the internship of his dreams… until the supervisor checked his facebook and took back his internship. Like the video said, many of his pictures were taken at bars and party scenes, including smoking a bong. I feel that he must not have wanted the internship that bad or else he would have erased his party pictures. I also know that a lot of my "friends" have pseudo names to protect themselves and their professions. Personally, I don't have that much to hide that I would want or need to make up a fake name. I am aware that what is on my facebook might not appeal to some employers, but I am not applying for a job or school. When that time comes, I had planned on erasing my facebook all together. However, the video mentioned that people can use the social media sites to their advantage by expressing their passion for their field of work. I am very passionate about my major and I could easily use facebook or other social media sites to my advantage.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Thank you for your comments, Lindsey and Kelsey. I like your points. While we need to be careful of "broadcasting" what you like and what we do, I also feel it is important for us to be "authentic" on social media. In some degree, job seeking is just like dating --- we want to true to ourselves and find the company that "values" and "appreciates" us as who we are. Then, both the employers and we will feel happy with the employment relationship. We don't want to "pretend" somebody else than the true "us," right?

    ReplyDelete
  4. This clip, I find can be an alarming fact to many social media users today. That picture or video that was hysterical the night before when you were out that got posted to your profile now is public property, that can always be accessed. Many people tend to forget this small fact; once it's online somewhere, it can always be found again somehow. We really need to be more cognizant of what is posted online and how it portrays our image to others. Yes, those photos of you with the naked guitar man in NYC are funny to you and your friends, but to a serious job perspective, maybe not so much. What many job hunters tend to forget is that the internet is a wealth of knowledge for the employers. Many can search your friends, view your photos, and even see your comments; which doesn't always portray us in a positive way. Keeping our social media protected and sculpted is a very important part of today's image. You are perceived through what you portray on your social media site. the comments you post on twitter, the links you post and reply to, and much more is tracked, whether we know it or not by potential employers. On the contrary, though, social media can also sharpen our image and professionalism. Following links and users who have important news to share can sharpen your appearance and make you stand out in a good way.

    Keeping up with current news and trends makes you stand out to potential employers, but posting pictures that pose conflict and tension can do just the opposite by destroying your image.

    ReplyDelete

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