Skip to main content

The Impact of the Oil Spill Accident: A Sustainability and Supply Chain Issue

It is not exaggerated to name the recent oil spill accident in the Gulf of Mexico a man-made disaster of the year. I live in Syracuse, New York, a place far, far away from the South. Yet, there is no way I am immune to the negative impact of this disaster.

I feel deeply sorry for the fishermen in Louisiana, who need to worry about their jobs and lives. If losing jobs and giving up a person’s normal life sounds terrible, I cannot find an appropriate adjective to describe the long-term impact of this disaster. For quite a while, many species will die or be poisoned. The whole ecosystem in the gulf will be destroyed. If we look at this accident as a supply chain issue, what can we expect?

· Many species in Mexican Gulf will struggle to survive, from seaweed, shrimps, oysters, fishes, birds, and many more.
· Other species in the Atlantic Ocean may also get affected if they rely on the “food” from Mexican Gulf.
· Seafood price will go up in restaurants and supermarkets. Some expect the price will double or triple in the future.
· The finishing industry, as well as those in the supply chain that support or benefit from this industry (e.g. transportation, ship manufacturers, seafood processor, etc.), may have to cease some operations, if not all.
· Restaurants, especially seafood restaurants, and the tourism industry in Mexican Gulf, including hotels, resorts, cruise ships, and airlines will suffer.

I cannot think of any winner of this disaster. The only preparation I can think of for foodservice managers and restaurant owners is to plan a new menu with less seafood, replacing them with steaks, pork chops, chicken, or some other “river-food” items, such as tilapia or Asian carp (http://linchikwok.blogspot.com/2010/02/are-you-ready-to-try-something-new-on.html). Hotels and resorts in Mexican Gulf may need to plan more indoor activities and keep their guests away from the beach.

By now, I hope we all learn a lesson. What suggestions will you provide to the industry?

References:
Picture was downloaded from http://tinyurl.com/linchikwok05032010P

Comments

  1. Oil Spill Already Hurting Florida's Panhandle Tourist-based Economy

    http://www.hotel-online.com/News/PR2010_2nd/May10_PanhandleTourism.html

    ReplyDelete

Post a Comment

Popular posts from this blog

Suggestive Selling – All You Have to Do is Ask!! (By Nicole Lee)

A simple, relatively normal thing occurred while in the drive-through at Del Taco with my boyfriend the other day.After placing our semi-high maintenance food order, the person taking my order, in a forced monotone voice, unenthusiastically asks, “Would you like to add our new blah, blah, blah for dessert?”All my sweet-tooth-driven ears heard was “dessert” and I wanted something sugary to complete my four-course drive-through meal. My boyfriend asked if I wanted the donut thing they were trying to push, but I ended up going with a churro.As we received our food, my boyfriend told the server, “Good job on the upsell.”In which we received the same unenthusiastic “thank you” in reply. This all led to a discussion about suggestive selling, how easy it is, how to do it correctly, and how beneficial it is.Of course, this Del Taco drive-through upsell experience did not meet our standards of how to do it correctly, but it worked!

Easy-Peasy
Both my boyfriend and I have sales and hospitality ba…

Is today's market too tough for upscale restaurants?

Operating a restaurant is never easy, but is it particularly challenging for upscale restaurants?

Restaurants Unlimited Inc., for instance, which operates 35 fine-dining and “polished casual” eateries, filed for bankruptcy in Delaware last week. Earlier in June, the Four Seasons Restaurant, an iconic spot for power lunch in Manhattan also closed for business after its reopening within less a year.

Are these two examples an isolated case or the tip of the iceberg? Then, if upscale restaurants are struggling to survive in today’s market, what challenges are they facing?

The rising labor cost

According to the Bloomberg report, Restaurant Unlimited Inc. hires 50 salaried employees at the chain’s headquarter in Seattle, plus another 168 full-time and 1,885 part-time restaurant workers. The rising wages in Seattle, San Francisco, and Portland have resulted in a total of $10.6 million wage expenses in the fiscal year of 2019. Nevertheless, its revenue for the year ended in May dropped 1%, at $…

Are consumers loyal to home-sharing services? Implications for hosts, room-sharing websites, and hoteliers