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Career Advice Suggested by a Restaurant Recruiter

Today, the recruiter of Lettuce Entertain You Restaurants (LEYE) spoke in my Human Resource Management class and conducted several job interviews on campus. She shared with students plenty of good advice about career management. Interestingly, yet not surprisingly, I agree with her on every piece of her advice. In addition to the fact that more managers are now screening potential candidates on social media, her suggestions are quite similar to the practical implications I drew from one of my research studies.

According to my research findings (Kwok et al., 2011), I made the following suggestions for those students who plan to start a hospitality career (p. 394):

  • Seek career advancement opportunities at work and take a leadership role in extra-curricular activities, class projects, and at work.
  • (Also suggested by the recruiter of LEYE) Understand their career goals and find a part-time job and/or an internship that closely matches their “dream jobs.”
  • Complete personality test(s) and thoroughly research a company before interview.
  • (Also suggested by the recruiter of LEYE) Prepare well for job interviews. Students need to show interest in the company they interview with by asking interviewers thoughtful and engaging questions and maintaining on-going conversations with the recruiters even after interviews.
  • Practice verbal and written communication, analytical, and problem-solving skills in class and at work. Knowledge of accounting and financial management is also important. Students need to illustrate that they understand “numbers” and can solve problems on their own.   
  • Inform recruiters if they are flexible at work and/or in the location where they begin a career.
  • Spend time in school, work, and extra-curricular activities wisely.

In addition to relevant work experience and interview behaviors, she also suggested that students need to show their interest to a job and company by giving the recruiter prompt responses. What other suggestions the recruiter made? Do you think her suggestions helpful? In what way?

References:
Kwok, L., Adams, C.R., & M.A. Price, (2011). Factors influencing hospitality recruiters’ hiring decisions in college recruiting. Journal of Human Resources in Hospitality and Tourism, 10, 372-399.
The picture was downloaded from the photo album on the Facebook page of LEYE.

Comments

  1. Interestingly enough, I was in the class that the LEYE recruiter spoke in, and really found most of her advice true and relevant. At the college level that I am at now, I often feel that there are so many people with different advice and suggestions for advancing from college into your career, and they do not always coincide with each other. What the LEYE recruiter spoke about and the tips she offered were achievable; which is often what i struggle with when accepting advice from other recruiters and advocates. I found her advice about researching the company profiles in advance to prepare for the interview to be very helpful and I also couldn't agree more with her statement about finding career goals and internships that will match closely with your "dream job". As a student in that position now, I really can appreciate the notion of internships; if you find the right one, it really can teach you an immeasurable amount of tools, skills and knowledge to carry onto your future career . In my experience as a career seeker, these suggestions really could have helped, looking back on past interviews and past job opportunities.

    Haleigh Schoeneck

    ReplyDelete
  2. I think what the LEYE recruiter suggesting that in a job interview one should have something engaging to talk about is true. Landing a job is knowing not only the front and the back cover of a company, but a thorough research on the company. So, you can talk about things you can bring to the company with your past job experiences and skills. Basically, preparing for the job is important because whatever they read on your resume they want to see the different side appearance & oral skills during the interview. They want hear something new and engaging during the interview and not something be re- read of off.

    ReplyDelete
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