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What Are the Most Inappropriate Guest Conducts You Have Ever Seen in a Hotel or a Restaurant?

Time can change a lot of things. When people show more understanding of others and become more acceptant to our diverse society, certain behaviors that used to be considered “blizzard” will no longer be seen as “inappropriate.” Decades ago, for example, people of colors were not allowed to ride in the front of a bus or eat in a fine dining restaurant. Thank goodness, those times have become history. The questions are: When can we draw the line for changes? And who is entitled to define the appropriate or inappropriate behaviors?

This NBC News video brings up an interesting case of hotel operations --- Is the Four Seasons Hotel in St. Louis Missouri doing the right thing by kicking a lesbian couple out of the property because they were kissing in the hotel’s jacuzzi? According the interview, the hotel received complaints from other guests and believes that kissing (either between heterosexual or homosexual couples) is one of those inappropriate conducts in the property.

Different from this Four Seasons in St. Louis, some other hotel chains and cruise lines are promoting their gay-friendly culture. What do you think of the approach used by the Four Seasons Hotel in St. Louis? What are your thoughts on those gay-friendly hotels, resorts, and restaurants? As a guest in a hotel or a restaurant, what are the most inappropriate or annoying behaviors you have ever seen? If you work in a hotel or a restaurant, how does your company define inappropriate guest behaviors? And what approaches your company will take when handling undesirable guest conducts?


References:
The picture shows a jacuzzi at the Four Seasons Hotel St. Louis, which was downloaded from the Four Seasons website.

Comments

  1. Personally I believe that the hotel handled the situation extremely unprofessionally. In a hotel, such as the Four Seasons, guests come to relax and many a time with a significant other. It is the responsibility of a hotel to accommodate the needs of their clientele and as long as the guests are not harmful to other guests the hotel should refrain from interfering. In the video clip the manager spoke about inappropriate behavior causing tension to guests. The homosexual couple retorted they were not explained what the inappropriate behavior was, and they explained how the whole experience was very disturbing and discomforting. As a hotel the upmost responsibility is to provide for their guests and create a hospitable and comfortable environment, which in this scenario they failed to complete. If in fact there is a policy of exterminating guests from the hotel when engaged in inappropriate behavior, it should be written down in documentation and presented to the guest respectively as proof of why they were asked to leave the hotel.

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  2. I agree with Leila. I feel like no one would ever say anything if someone saw a heterosexual couple kissing in the hotel. Because they were homosexuals, they were discriminated against which is never okay to do. This story actually relates to the restaurant I have been waitressing at for the past 2 years. One of our old managers was a lesbian and her girlfriend came in all the time. She usually didn’t kiss her goodbye in public but sometimes she would, and we never had a complaint. None of the workers would ever say anything. Being a lesbian is no reason to be treated differently and have to follow different rules when in a hospitality location. I understand that if people may feel uncomfortable because some individuals don’t feel comfortable with homosexuals. At the same time though, it is a free world and people are allowed to do whatever they please. If homosexuals aren’t allowed to kiss in public then heterosexuals shouldn’t be allowed to either. Every guest should be notified with a sign before entering the building (somewhere public for all to see). If they want no public displays of affection to make everyone feel comfortable when in the environment, they have to make sure not to discriminate and make the same rules for every guest at the hotel.

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