Skip to main content

Mobile Technology and Company Security: A Post Contributed by Steven Farrell*

The explosive growth of mobile technology has done wonders for business communications and employee productivity. Smart phones are now more than 15 percent of the handset market in the U.S. Tablet PCS are flying off the shelves and laptop computer sales remain strong. A person no longer needs to be in an office to retrieve, send or create important documents. GPS and tracking software on PDAs and smart phones make it easy to confirm where and employee is and what they're doing. Though these devices increase productivity, they are not without risks for companies and employees alike.

Data Theft

It is much easier to hack a cellular device than it is to tap a land line. While data encryption offers some control, it can be cracked by a determined expert. Theft is another problem. While many people treat their mobile devices as an appendage, they can still be left on a table in a restaurant or picked from a pocket in a crowd. If password protection is not rigorously used, sensitive corporate data can be lost or stolen. Wipe technology can also be installed, locking the device after several failed password attempts. A remote network administrator can then erase the device's memory if a security breach is suspected.

Data Transfer

Many mobile technology devices, particularly smart phones have a short service life before being upgraded. When exchanging one device for another, data should be backed up, then erased completely from the device's memory. Failure to do this can result in loss of proprietary information. A shocking number of smart phones and PDAs show up on eBay with company emails and documents still on board!

Voice Etiquette

While data can be lost, hacked or stolen from mobile devices, it can be much simpler than that. Astonishingly, many people still feel the need to raise their voices while talking on cell phones in lines, stores, coffee shops and airports. Forgetting that people can overhear what's being said should be addressed. Sensitive information should not be discussed in crowded or public areas.

Viruses and Spyware

With increased use of tablet PCs, laptops and smart phones comes increased exposure to viruses and spyware. Employees that use their company devices for social networking, shopping and surfing are particularly vulnerable. When the devices are linked back to the company network, viruses and spyware can corrupt or steal data.

Prevention

Developing a strict mobile IT policy is key to avoiding sensitive data. Enforcement of data encryption and password protection also help. Exclusive use of secured wireless networks will also help accidental loss of data over "evil twin" wireless hotspots. Updating of anti-spyware, anti-virus software and firewall protection is also important to keeping company information safe.

* Steven Farrell is the administrator of ReversePhoneLookup.org.

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

Do you know where your prospects hang out during the #DeleteFacebook movement?

Facebook used to the cool place where everybody hangs out. Not long ago, Facebook was ranked the most visited website in the world , and the website where Americans spent the most time. Facebook page then became the most popular social media platform for business-to-consumer communications among various types of organizations. In recent years, however, Facebook faced several backlashes toward the platform’s data privacy practices and its CEO. Facebook is experiencing some challenges of maintaining its popularity among internet users, some of whom even call for a #DeleteFacebook movement . I myself, also notice a shift in my teenaged students’ interest in Facebook, even before the #DeleteFacebook backlash. So, if Facebook is no longer the cool place where everybody hangs out, which social media platforms can we use to communicate with our prospective consumers? The most popular social media platforms among U.S. teens According to a 2018 Pew Research Center report

Are neighbors friends or foes? A study of Airbnb listings' agglomeration effect

“Location, location, location.” Location is often perceived as the most important factor when people assess the value of a home or property. In the lodging industry, location is an essential attribute of a property and can significantly affect a hotel’s financial performance. Airbnb and the broader home-sharing businesses represent a new form of lodging products. Location is also a significant, influential factor that affects travelers’ purchasing decisions of a home-sharing stay.   Recent research suggests that Airbnb listings are usually found in such popular locations as tourist attractions and points of interest. When more Airbnb listings are located in the same neighborhood, the competition will become more intense.   Intense competition can be harmful to businesses, especially when they enter a price war. If that’s the case, why would Airbnb hosts choose to operate their short-term residential rental businesses in the neighborhood with oth

Promoting student success in the STR Student Market Study Competition

Cal Poly Pomona students placed second at the STR Student Market Study Competition I was in New York City (NYC) over the Veterans Day weekend for the HX: The Hotel Experience 2019 , one of the most important trade shows in the lodging industry . Similar to last year’s trade show , the HX 2019 also entailed four components, including HX: The Marketplace, HX: The Conference, Boutique Design New York, and the STR (Smith Travel Research) Student Market Study Competition.   STR is the leading data analytics provider for the lodging industry. Since its debut in 2015, the STR Student Market Study Competition (the STR Competition hereafter) has received significant attention from the hospitality programs around the world. This year, over 20 students from the Collins College of Hospitality Management at Cal Poly Pomona traveled to NYC for HX 2019. Moreover, six of them also participated in the STR Competition for the first time. In the end, the Cal Poly Pomona team