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The Importance of Adaptability and Flexibility

Technology, management practices, and operation procedures … you name it, everything is now changing in a very fast pace. During the time when changes is the only constant, companies are seeking for CEOs who are adaptable leaders. Even under current recession with record high unemployment rate, “the number of executive searches in North America rose about 33% during the first half of this year” (Lubin @ The Wall Street Journal).

According the Clarke Murphy, who leads a global CEO search firm, companies look for assertive leaders who are able to change quickly --- e.g. developing and launching new products and going into new markets. Those “strong operators who can adapt quickly and gain the confidence of employees and shareholders” are in high demand.

Indeed, adaptability and flexibility are two critical attributes that a job candidate should have no matter if s/he is applying for a CEO position or an entry level job. Two years ago, I also interviewed a regional recruiter of a hotel chain about her expectations of hospitality students during the time when she selected student candidates for managerial positions. She told me: “Being flexible is important. For example, if a student told me s/he only wants to work in Houston as an event planner, s/he just narrowed her opportunity from 200 to 1 or zero.” Last year, I also saw some talented SU graduates leaving school without a job --- not because they were not ready, probably because they only wanted to work in a full service hotel in Manhattan.

To secure a job offer and succeed in a hospitality career, one must be flexible in terms of jobs and locations. Good opportunities are often presented to those who are willing to move from one city to another and/or from one functional or operational area to another. Being adaptable helps develop a person’s managerial and leadership skills. So, if you are looking for a job, are you flexible and adaptable? If so, how well can you demonstrate your attributes in your resume and during interview? In the near future, we will discuss more detail in resume writing and interview preparations.

References:
Lubin, J.S. (2010, August 9). Recruiting firm finds adaptable CEOs in high demand. The Wall Street Journal, p. B6.
Picture was downloaded from: http://www.kimminsdesign.com/if.htm

Comments

  1. I always have this question as well? Do you think is appropriate as an applicant (like me) to raise questions as what you asked to Ms Clarke Murthy & Directors of Crowne Plaza at career fair? interview?

    For example

    1. what is his/her expectations of applicants (aka hospitality students) during the time when she selected student candidates for the job?

    2. What is their recruiment process?

    Also, How detailed information should I reviewd in my facebook profile/linked in profile? Sometimes, especially in Linked In..the work experience details might match up with your "resume" basically. So would you feel secured to review those detail information? Also would it be better not to review but send them the resume through application process for the job? What do you think?

    ReplyDelete
  2. Very good questions, Amy.

    I highly recommend you to take my Leadership and Career Management class. As a matter of fact, the first lecture I does for that class answers all the questions you asked above. It is also a research project I've completed before. The manuscripts are under review at this point. Once they are published, I will let you know and provide you a copy of the research findings.

    I actually prepared similar questions to the hotel managers. We did not have enough time to cover all questions during the tour. I very appreciate the managers. They did a very thorough and provided us plenty of insightful information about hotel operations. You may ask these questions the next time when we do a hotel tour and when we have a guest speaker speaking in the class.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Thank you very much Dr. Kwok, I have always wanted to take your HPM 300 Leadership and Career Management class & HPM 314. Unfortunately I have taken both of the classes in my freshman year.
    YES do I have a 2nd chance?

    i think another method for me to have the answers for these questions are from your research findings & for me to be your research assistant. I enjoy sharing your blog articles to my friends & family,very insightful indeed.

    Have a great night!

    ReplyDelete
  4. Really awesome effort by this blogger. First time read such type of blog post. Thanks for sharing it dear.
    Online MBA

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  5. wonderful post. this is very well written and unique. Thank you for sharing this post here. keep sharing this in future. Hotel Management Course in Malaysia

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  6. I like your post. You gives to me a good knowledge. It is related to my interest for Hotel Management Software Apps. Writing method of this post is good. Nice work,

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