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Is It OK for Hotel Staff to Wear Piercings and Tattoos?

Time has changed. I see more and more college students wearing piercings and tattoos nowadays, but is it OK for hotel staff to wear piercings and tattoos?

The answer is “no, no, no.” According a report at USAToday.com, customers across the board do not want to see any hotel workers with pierced eyebrow, pierced tongue, tattooed arm, or nose ring. Some may argue that tattooed and pierced workers may seem more acceptable in edgy boutique hotels as compared to the big franchised hotels, but the survey results did not find any differences among a variety of lodging products.

Many respondents believe people who wear visible tattoos and piercings are taking a high risk of their professional lives. If you stay in a hotel, do you mind being served by tattooed and/or pierced staff? What if you are the one who makes the hiring decision?

References:
USAToday.com: http://tinyurl.com/linchikwok08042010
Picture was downloaded from http://tinyurl.com/linchikwok08042010P

Comments

  1. Now, more than ever, there is a market for tattooed and pierced hospitality establishments. Tattoos and piercings are more common than they have ever been, and judging on the lifestyles of the up and coming generations, permanent body art is only going to increase in popularity.

    I am personally all about ambiance. If I am at a trendy or alternative bar, club or hotel I almost expect to see trendy people working there. Where as, if I am at an elegant establishment I don't expect to see any tattoo's, and neither do most traditional patrons that make up the demographic of high end businesses. I think it should be said that the stereotype that plagues the tattooed and pierced population can be found accurate in some cases, but in my general experience inked employees and people are equally competent, and in some cases more personable than their undecorated counterparts.

    Current hospitality college graduates are entering a very diverse industry. Tattoos will forever be taboo at highly esteemed hotels such as Waldorf hotels, the Four Seasons and W Hotels. However, there is a new market for boutique hotels and trendy alternative restaurants that welcome tatted up employees, because that is the demographic they are appealing to. So, in agreement with the above post before getting inked you should seriously consider your desired lifestyle, and career path as well as where, and what you get tattooed.

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  2. I recently stayed at a choice hotel property in which both front desk workers have visible tattoos and piercings. It was a little off setting but it don't cause me any problems or did not make me want to not stay at the hotel. In my personal opinion and because i have several visible piercings myself, they are a form of art and expression, and in my personal experience a great conversation piece for most guests that walk into the hotel. I've found many times that even the most uncooperative most unchatty guest can take one look at my piercings and suddenly we're speaking words every time they walk by. That being said, although i am young and have piercings, none of which i plan on altering for the sake of a job, i'm also conscious of what piercings i have and where they are placed. For example, i only have a nose ring because i know that is more likely to be accepted than a lip piercings or eyebrow ring. When i get my first tattoo, i have planned it to be in an area that is not at all visible while at work and would hinder my getting a job.
    Although i believe that piercings tattoos should and i believe are becoming more interested in the work place, i also believe that we have to be smart about where we place such items.
    If i were a hiring position i believe that i would hire a person with tattoos and piercings. I believe it adds diversity to the workplace just as hiring people of different races.

    -Kelly Hodges

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  3. I feel that workers should cover tattoos and limit their piercings while at work. I don't believe that the workers who have tattoos or piercings are less qualified, I would just prefer not to be served by someone covered in tattoos or with multiple piercings when I am out in a place deemed more elegant. As a manager, I would prefer my employees to cover tattoos and limit facial piercings because I believe that most customers would feel the same as I do. Susan Miller

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