Skip to main content

Bedbug Issue in NYC

Last month, I talked about bedbug issue in hotels. It seems that this problem has not gone away yet. Today’s ABC News video indicates that bedbugs have become a big threat to New York City’s tourism industry.

As a traveler, will you choose another destination if the bedbug problem continues in the City? Would you rather pay more for a room in a franchised hotel or a hotel that you know well? Would you rely more on online reviews or even google “bedbug + hotel name” before making reservations?

If you are running a hotel in the City, what measures will you take to communicate and educate your team members about this issue? How do you keep bedbugs away from your property? How do you monitor and maintain your hotel’s “positive” online reputation?

Comments

  1. In July, an AMC theatre in Times Square had customers complain of bedbugs. The movie theatre responded to this problem by replacing the infested movie theatre seats with new ones. The movie theatre closed down for the night and treated the facility. This issue of bedbugs ultimately affected the movie theatre’s reputation.
    It is would be beneficial for hotels to follow a similar procedure to address the issue of bed bug. Hotels should replace the sheets of the infected rooms and make sure to treat the entire facility. After an epidemic is reported, the hotel should also admit to the problem and publicize the steps that they are taking to address the issue. Bedbugs are a serious concern for travelers and relates to the cleanliness of a hotel.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Bedbugs are not a problem that begin and end in a hotel room. Instead, bedbugs follow the travelers wherever they go and easily spread. The worst place the bedbugs follow the travelers to is their homes. It costs travelers a lot of money to rid of bed bugs from their houses and therefore, it would be a much more money saving to spend a night at a slightly more expensive franchised hotel.
    Seeing that bedbugs have become a spreading problem, it would be a big factor of choosing whether or not to stay at a certain hotel. If I was running a hotel in the City, I would educate the staff about what bedbugs are what they look like, what safety measures to follow, and how to get rid of them as quickly and quietly as possible. I would also inform the travelers about bedbug precautions and to be careful of their luggage and clothes.
    I would maintain my hotel’s “positive” online reputation by using extra funds to have inspections and make sure that we do not have any bedbugs in the hotel at all.

    ReplyDelete
  3. If were a traveler and I heard that there were bedbugs in the hotel that I was staying at in NYC I would choose another destination and pay more for a room in a franchised hotel. Because bedbugs have become such a huge issue in the hotel industry I wouldn’t take any chances. Bed bugs travel very easily and if I were to stay in a hotel that had them I would probably bring them back to my home and that would be an even bigger issue. If I were running a hotel in NYC I would inform my team members about how to inspect, and treat the rooms for bed bugs. I would also tell my bellmen to place the guests luggage on the luggage stands as opposed to the beds as a safety precaution. I would have an online monitor to check up on responses to the cleanliness of my hotel and if bedbugs ever were a problem in my hotel I would have them inform the media immediately that the issue has already been taken care of.

    ReplyDelete

Post a Comment

Popular posts from this blog

Is today's market too tough for upscale restaurants?

Operating a restaurant is never easy, but is it particularly challenging for upscale restaurants?

Restaurants Unlimited Inc., for instance, which operates 35 fine-dining and “polished casual” eateries, filed for bankruptcy in Delaware last week. Earlier in June, the Four Seasons Restaurant, an iconic spot for power lunch in Manhattan also closed for business after its reopening within less a year.

Are these two examples an isolated case or the tip of the iceberg? Then, if upscale restaurants are struggling to survive in today’s market, what challenges are they facing?

The rising labor cost

According to the Bloomberg report, Restaurant Unlimited Inc. hires 50 salaried employees at the chain’s headquarter in Seattle, plus another 168 full-time and 1,885 part-time restaurant workers. The rising wages in Seattle, San Francisco, and Portland have resulted in a total of $10.6 million wage expenses in the fiscal year of 2019. Nevertheless, its revenue for the year ended in May dropped 1%, at $…

Suggestive Selling – All You Have to Do is Ask!! (By Nicole Lee)

A simple, relatively normal thing occurred while in the drive-through at Del Taco with my boyfriend the other day.After placing our semi-high maintenance food order, the person taking my order, in a forced monotone voice, unenthusiastically asks, “Would you like to add our new blah, blah, blah for dessert?”All my sweet-tooth-driven ears heard was “dessert” and I wanted something sugary to complete my four-course drive-through meal. My boyfriend asked if I wanted the donut thing they were trying to push, but I ended up going with a churro.As we received our food, my boyfriend told the server, “Good job on the upsell.”In which we received the same unenthusiastic “thank you” in reply. This all led to a discussion about suggestive selling, how easy it is, how to do it correctly, and how beneficial it is.Of course, this Del Taco drive-through upsell experience did not meet our standards of how to do it correctly, but it worked!

Easy-Peasy
Both my boyfriend and I have sales and hospitality ba…

Are consumers loyal to home-sharing services? Implications for hosts, room-sharing websites, and hoteliers