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Sheraton SU's Green Initiatives and LED Light Bulbs

On Wednesday, the Hotel & Resort Operations class and I toured the Sheraton Syracuse University Hotel & Conference Center on campus. We met with eight executives and learned from their own words about how they lead their divisions to meet the departmental and organizational goals.

One of the commitments this hotel makes is to maintain its leading position in guest satisfaction and green initiatives. Over the years, the hotel has already lowered its energy consumption by 30 to 35 percents after installing the energy management system; it also cuts waste from 36 tons/month to 14-16 tons/month (the ultimate goal is to lower the number to around 10 tons/month). In addition, the hotel plans to replace the existing light bulbs with LED light bulbs, which will probably take the hotel’s green commitment to the next level.

Why do LED light bulbs seem so important in this case? As suggested in the embedded CNN News video, LED light bulbs is 10 times more efficient than the traditional incandescent light bulbs and can last for decades. The City of Los Angeles started using LED light bulbs for street lights since 2008 and has made substantial savings (55% reductions). L.A. sets a “green” example of using LED light bulbs. I am glad that the Sheraton Syracuse University Hotel & Conference Center is also ahead of most hotels.

As managers, what green initiatives do you take in your hotel? As hotel guests, how much do you value a hotel’s commitment to the environments?

Comments

  1. I was on the tour of the Sheraton and I found their “Green Initiative” to be one of their strongest qualities. The Engineering Manager had said the property has been honored with numerous awards commending their steps to be “green” and be a leader in the initiative. People who travel to the area frequently are more likely to stay with the same hotel if they know the hotel is concerned with big issues, conservation and sustainability being the two biggest of the time. Their waste reduction numbers were astounding. Last spring, three of my classmates and I did research and found that Syracuse University students dispose of 568 tons of food waste (the equivalent of 124 Asian elephants.) The Sheraton’s energy management system is very advanced with sensors to know when someone is in the room, without the person having to move about. The system allows for the guest to adjust the heat/air to their comfort level when the room is registered as “checked-in” but maintains an energy efficient level when the room is vacant. Hotel lighting is a big selling point to me. The lighting can be too dark or too bright, harsh or soft; but I am more concerned in the lighting itself than the light emitted. In my home we have switched to energy efficient light bulbs and I am always glad to see when hotels do the same. I look forward to seeing the Sheraton after its renovations, especially their advances to be “greener.”

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