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Happy Advertisements

Today’s good news is companies are picking up their spending on advertisements in a variety of media, including magazines, broadcasting, and Internet. This MSNBC video moves further by reviewing a brief history of advertisements and discussing the methods of creating an iconic advertisement. A good advertisement must carry “a story” in a short time and be associated with “emotions,” such as happiness.
I agree. In addition, I would like to see the “wow” effect and innovation from an advertisement. Referring back to our previous discussion on trends in innovation, I also believe it is critical for today’s multi-media advertisements to convey an image of a company, a product, or service with consistent, happy, and short stories. The ultimate goal is to make the target audience happy and push them to purchase a product or service. In turn, companies will feel pleased with the impacts of happy advertisements. What happy advertisements do you remember? How effective are they in pushing you to make a purchasing decision?

Comments

  1. When I saw that you made a comment about today's advertisement it struck an interest in me because me and my roommate were actually discussing advertising today in the media. I agree with the fact that happy advertisements sell a product better especially if it has a short story with a happy storyline. However I've noticed a recent trend in company's advertisements. Recently it seems that instead of having a storyline in the ad more and more companies are creating ads that are completely random and fairly discuss the product being pushed. For instance, the new Old Spice Commercials where the leading man goes from being in a hot tub to on a horse to on the beach to a motorcycle. The actual product is barely even mentioned until the end where the screen reads Old Spice. However, this technique seems to work because the ad is so random and entertaining it grasps the viewers attention and by the end of the ad the viewers will read the product name and want it.

    I completely agree that through the 90s and early 2000s, and even nowadays many commercials and ads were produced by creating a fun and happy short story. However, it seems that recently the trend is to create randomness strangeness in the ad. Doing so grasps the viewers attention.

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