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Ways to Clean Up a Person's Negative Online Reputation

I shared two news videos in July 2010 on how to manage a person’s online reputation (FoxNews video and ABCNews video). But what if somebody already has a negative online reputation? Is there any way to clean up the mess?

This ABCNews video presents several ways to “reboot” a person’s online reputation. The easiest and most expensive way is to hire a professional for help. More directly, a person can contact those people or the websites to take off the “inappropriate” content from the Internet. It is also important to use a person’ real name to set up Facebook and Twitter accounts. Personally, if people ask me if it is fine to post some “questionable” information or pictures of themselves, I would tell them: “If you think they are questionable, they probably are.” Do you agree?

Comments

  1. HPM 314
    I understand that Facebook is supposed to be a personal place, but with the majority of marketing happening via the internet, marketing yourself on Facebook is important. I am always careful about the content of my pictures and my status posts. A club I was involved with in high school had the assistant District Attorney come to our school to talk about internet safety and intelligence. The scariest thing is that once you post a picture on you profile, it is available online and sometimes can never be permanently deleted. He told us the best way to keep you online image clean is by asking: “if my mother saw/read this’ would she approve?” I have some knowledge about how your “digital real estate” can hurt your future. A classmate of mine had a scholarship to a college for baseball, but when his coach found pictures of him parting with alcohol and marijuana, the coach had to bench him for his senior season and he had to inform the college scout. He lost his scholarship and had to find a new path to take after graduation. If coaches and scouts are looking at Facebook, MySpace, and Twitter, than it is very probable the future employers can see what you were up to last weekend.

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