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Are You Ready to Try Something New On the Table?

Today’s ABC News proposed a “new” strategy of dealing with the threat of Asian carp, the fish imported from China to the southern states in the 70s to clean algae in fish farms. Since it “migrated” in the U.S., it breeds quickly and eats other fish’s food in the lake. What can we do to save other species? ABC News suggests a solution --- EAT ‘EM. The fact is “(Asian carp) has 70% more Omega-3 than in catfish and tilapia,” and Chef Philippe Parola is promoting his new Asian carp dishes in the National Grocers Association Convention in Las Vegas.

Over the years, creative chefs think out of the box and come up with innovative ways or menu items to deal with the recession. We see trends of going green, using local ingredients, and putting healthy nutritional items on the menu. A column by “Something Special From Wisconsin” suggested chefs these days may buy more than just steaks, chicken breast, and pork chops. They purchase whole cows and pigs from local farms, and they want to use as much of an animals as possible.

I give two thumbs up to these creative chefs. Their work not only benefits local communities, but also provides more options to customers. By offering something different to customers, a restaurant may find a niche to stand itself out from the crowd. The challenge, however, is how to educate customers to try something “new” on the menu. I remember my American friends sometimes make fun of me for being a Cantonese because we are “known” for strange Cantonese food --- the rumor is we eat anything with four legs except tables. This time, I can make fun of my American friends for having troubles of the Asian crap threat --- we can easily solve this problem with some creative Cantonese housewives at home. Like it or not, probably a creative chef will soon introduce you something new on the table. Are you ready?

References:
ABC News: http://abcnews.go.com/print?id=9830667
Wisconsinrapidstribune.com: http://www.wisconsinrapidstribune.com/article/20100214/CWS04/2140319/1845/WRT04/Bergin-column--Restaurant-offers-the-familiar---with-something-extra-
Picture (not an Asian carp, but a tilapia) was copied from http://1.bp.blogspot.com/_VD_Q0lgbr1Y/SpsQBZp2l0I/AAAAAAAAACk/OA_5_-4NhVg/s1600-h/DSC_0683.jpg
Video was downloaded from http://abcnews.go.com/WNT/video/eating-asian-carp-stop-spread-9831471

Comments

  1. A similar story on April 26th's Wall Street Journal

    WSJ.com - Asian Carp Fix: Just Eat It http://on.wsj.com/bUyq7h

    ReplyDelete

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