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A New Challenge for Chefs: Cooking without Salt

Felix Ortiz, a New York assemblyman, proposed a bill that prohibits restaurants adding salt on food. If restaurants are caught doing that, a fine of $1,000 will be issued. New York City has banned unhealthy ingredients like trans-fats in food preparation. Many restaurants in the City have also listed calories information on the menu. Now, the governors switched their attention to salt because about 1.5 million New Yorkers have high blood pressure. Some governors believe the new bill of banning salt will help New Yorkers consume less sodium and possibly solve the high-blood-pressure problem.

I understand the reason of banning trans-fats because restaurants may find some replaceable. I am not sure about salt. I admit I am not a professional chef. Neither did I spend much time working in a commercial kitchen. My experience of cooking at home informs me I cannot cook without salt unless I want to eat bland food every day.

As a matter of fact, even though eating too much sodium will increase blood pressure, inadequate salt consumption may also cause other health problems. If chefs are not allowed to cook with salt, how about other seasonings that might contain salt? In the future, chefs’ lives could be a lot easier --- they can forget recipes; they can just boil, steam, or fry whatever food it is and put them on the table with seasonings. Let’s hope consumers will prepare a meal themselves on the table. What do you think about this bill?

References:
Telegraph.Co.UK: http://tinyurl.com/linchikwok03142010
Picture was copied from: http://todaysseniorsnetwork.com/Salt.jpg

Comments

  1. I am strongly opposed to this bill. Where is the responsibility of the consumer to pay attention to what goes into their bodies? If they have sodium restricted diets, they should order food accordingly. Many, many chefs would be accommodating. After all, it is in the chef's best interest to please the customer.

    This type of legislation driven to the restauranteur is ridiculous. What about all the fast food and convenience food that is loaded with sodium? Salt is important for flavor and balance as much as it is important for preservation.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Another Wall Steet Journal article discusses how restaurants encourage Americans to eat junk food.

    http://tinyurl.com/linchikwok03172010F

    I feel both restaurants and consumers share the responsibility of food choice. What do you want to eat? Unhealthy-yet-many-people-like items or healthy food. Isn't it what America stands for? Providing choices to everyone so that we can make informed judgements?

    ReplyDelete
  3. HOw in the world did it become the governments decision to make? We as a consumer should be allowed to decide what we put in our bodies.. If you choose to not eat salt ask that your food be prepared with less.

    ReplyDelete
  4. Like Salt? Salty Foods May Be Easing Out in New York

    "The initiative is voluntary, and participating companies, restaurants, and chains include Starbucks, Heinz, Au Bon Pain, Subway and Goya. They have agreed to reduce salt in their products by 25 percent over the next five years. Other restaurants and companies have been urged to join the initiative as well."

    http://www.nytix.com/Blog/newyorkcity/2010/04/like-salt-salty-foods-may-be-easing-out.html

    ReplyDelete

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