Skip to main content

Hotel's Fashion Statement

Probably because of the New York Fashion Week, attention has been focused on fashion in September. This month’s Lodging Magazine also features an article about hotel designs. More hotel brands are making their fashion statements by introducing new properties, new lobbies, new guestrooms, new bathroom, new restaurants, and new service. The magazine outlines the evolution of hotel architecture:

• 1950s – Basic motels with simple rooms were the norm.
• 1960s – First atrium hotel was introduced.
• 1970s – Specialty restaurants and distinct pool areas were integrated in mixed-use hotels.
• 1980s – Guestroom “suite” concept was introduced.
• 1990s – Overall guest experience is emphasized, with spacious lobbies and revitalized products in rooms (i.e. Starwood’s Heavenly Bed and Heavenly Shower).
• 2000s and beyond – More technology gadgets are equipped in rooms.

Looking forward, trends of going green and high-tech are expected. “Trends, like fashion, will come and go, but strong, timeless design that captures the guest’s imagination and emotional core is, ultimately, the most sustainable approach.” I believe the core is all about meeting guest expectations and needs. A good hotel design must be functional while providing the memorable “wow” experience to customers.

Want to read more about hotel design? Please check out the following discussion: Award Winning Motel 6Update of Holiday Inn ExpressHotel Design, and Fashion Director in the W Hotels.

References:
Cimini, M. (2010, September). Designed with a purpose: Examining the evolution and trends in hotel design. Lodging Magazine, 38-40.
Picture was downloaded from http://tinyurl.com/linchikwok09132010P

Comments

  1. What truly makes a person choose a hotel, motel or Bed & Breakfast? Does it depend on their past experiences, their taste, a brand being embedded in them? With all the influential factors that could possibly exist I feel as though room decor is just another among many variables. Some people may not be into the stereotypical bed and breakfast decor. Kittens and flowers are not everyone's forte, but establishments are beginning to recognize this and are moving towards drastic, modern looks. However, you see the same delima with choosing a decor in restaurants. People will not become patrons of a place in which they don't feel comfortable. Chipotle has wonderful initiatives to become "Green" and all-natural (like the prospering trend), but many people hate the industrial decor so they won't stay and dine at the facilities.
    Therefore I see hotels falling into the same predicament. How do you decorate and design your hotel so that it applies to all of your target markets? A cutting-edge business has different styles that appeal to them than a family does. Can the style and decor of a room be part of the selection? Or should your whole hotel follow one theme? Something to consider....

    Amber Lingenfelter
    Hotel Operations

    ReplyDelete

Post a Comment

Popular posts from this blog

Yammer: A Social Networking Site Exclusively for the Workplace

Effective internal communications among employees are related to some desirable organizational outcomes, such as robust morale, a clear vision, low turnover, and high employee engagement. The question is what platform can serve the purpose. This ABC News video introduces “ Yammer ,” an exclusive internal communication tool for companies. A user must use a valid company e-mail address to sign up for an account. Once an account is validated, the user will be led to the company page that is pretty much like a Facebook page. The difference is that only the users whose e-mail addresses share the same domain can see the wall and communicate with each other. I have no question about whether Yammer could be a useful internal communication tool for companies, but I just wonder: how many social networking sites do people need for communication? Why people have to “create” so many platforms or channels for “effective communications”? To many people, Facebook is only for “friends,” whe

Can leisure and work-from-home demand stimulate extended-stay hotel growth beyond COVID-19?

The lodging industry is   struggling   to fill the empty rooms in 2020. For months, U.S. hotels are running at an occupancy of 50% or lower.     Not every segment   suffers the same impact from the pandemic, however. Demand for   home-sharing  facilities had already bounced back over the summer. Airbnb reported a higher booking than last year. Marriott’s home-sharing arm is also doing well, seeing a sevenfold increase in booking over last summer.     Similar to what a residential rental or home-sharing facility   offers , guestrooms in extended-stay hotels also feature a full-size kitchen or a kitchenette. Extended-stay hotels are designed for travelers who want to stay at a “home” when away from home. A guestroom at the Residence Inn Miami Sunny Isles Beach   Extended-stay hotels vs. home-sharing facilities     Because COVID-19 is primarily transmitted through direct or indirect human contacts, people are highly encouraged to avoid unnecessary human interactions, leading to more   con

Will restaurants of the future still need a dining room?

It does not seem the coronavirus is leaving us soon, although we have seen good   progress in developing the vaccine . In recent weeks, many places reported   a surge of new infected COVID-19 cases . Some even resumed   lockdowns   and the mask-mandate order, forcing restaurants to   shut down indoor dining   services again.     As a short-term remedy, restaurants immediately shifted their offering to   curbside pickup and delivery  services. Meanwhile, restaurants are testing new concepts to embrace the   contactless self-service  trend for the future. Here are some examples,     Chipotle opened its first digital-only restaurant     The new prototype, known as the   Chipotle Digital Kitchen , debut in Highland Falls, NY, earlier this month. Different from the traditional Chipotle restaurant, the Chipotle Digital Kitchen features:     A lobby designated for pickup services through off-premise orders.   A see-through kitchen, allowing customers to see, smell, and hear what is going on b