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Hotel's Fashion Statement

Probably because of the New York Fashion Week, attention has been focused on fashion in September. This month’s Lodging Magazine also features an article about hotel designs. More hotel brands are making their fashion statements by introducing new properties, new lobbies, new guestrooms, new bathroom, new restaurants, and new service. The magazine outlines the evolution of hotel architecture:

• 1950s – Basic motels with simple rooms were the norm.
• 1960s – First atrium hotel was introduced.
• 1970s – Specialty restaurants and distinct pool areas were integrated in mixed-use hotels.
• 1980s – Guestroom “suite” concept was introduced.
• 1990s – Overall guest experience is emphasized, with spacious lobbies and revitalized products in rooms (i.e. Starwood’s Heavenly Bed and Heavenly Shower).
• 2000s and beyond – More technology gadgets are equipped in rooms.

Looking forward, trends of going green and high-tech are expected. “Trends, like fashion, will come and go, but strong, timeless design that captures the guest’s imagination and emotional core is, ultimately, the most sustainable approach.” I believe the core is all about meeting guest expectations and needs. A good hotel design must be functional while providing the memorable “wow” experience to customers.

Want to read more about hotel design? Please check out the following discussion: Award Winning Motel 6Update of Holiday Inn ExpressHotel Design, and Fashion Director in the W Hotels.

References:
Cimini, M. (2010, September). Designed with a purpose: Examining the evolution and trends in hotel design. Lodging Magazine, 38-40.
Picture was downloaded from http://tinyurl.com/linchikwok09132010P

Comments

  1. What truly makes a person choose a hotel, motel or Bed & Breakfast? Does it depend on their past experiences, their taste, a brand being embedded in them? With all the influential factors that could possibly exist I feel as though room decor is just another among many variables. Some people may not be into the stereotypical bed and breakfast decor. Kittens and flowers are not everyone's forte, but establishments are beginning to recognize this and are moving towards drastic, modern looks. However, you see the same delima with choosing a decor in restaurants. People will not become patrons of a place in which they don't feel comfortable. Chipotle has wonderful initiatives to become "Green" and all-natural (like the prospering trend), but many people hate the industrial decor so they won't stay and dine at the facilities.
    Therefore I see hotels falling into the same predicament. How do you decorate and design your hotel so that it applies to all of your target markets? A cutting-edge business has different styles that appeal to them than a family does. Can the style and decor of a room be part of the selection? Or should your whole hotel follow one theme? Something to consider....

    Amber Lingenfelter
    Hotel Operations

    ReplyDelete

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