Skip to main content

Smart Phones as Room Keys

Starwood introduced a “Smart Check-In” pilot program in February 2010, allowing selected Starwood Preferred Guests (SPG) to skip the Front Desk and use their SPG cards as room keys. This pilot program provides guests an option of skipping the Front Desk during their stay. Today, InterContinental Hotel Group (IHG) introduced a similar pilot program at the Holiday Inn & Suites Chicago O’Hare and the Holiday Inn Express downtown Houston. In these two locations, guests may choose to use their smart phones as room keys (as demonstrated in the embedded video). Here is how it works:

• Guests opt to participate in the program by registering through e-mail or at the Front Desk.
• On the day of arrival, the room number as well as a secured link will be sent to the registered guests’ smart phones via text messages.
• Guests may then open the door with the secured link.

Even though IHG plans to introduce this “mobile-key” concept to more properties, guests may still choose between the smart-phone key and the traditional keycard options. As a manager, how do you evaluate this smart phone practice as a company’s mobile strategy? As a customer, how do you use your smart phones when you travel?

References:
U.S.A. Today: http://tinyurl.com/linchikwok09202010
The embedded video was brought to us via http://innovationcenter.ihg.com/

Comments

  1. I like the idea of using ones mobile as a room key. The only idea I do not like is skipping the front desk and knowing/ talking to the workers (guest interactions). In some ways I feel less of a security at times if I was a worker in some unexplainable. But I think it is a great idea of not going through the hassle to wait at the front desk and check in. Especially if you are coming in late or in a rush.

    HPM 321
    Sara Hwang

    ReplyDelete

Post a Comment

Popular posts from this blog

Suggestive Selling – All You Have to Do is Ask!! (By Nicole Lee)

A simple, relatively normal thing occurred while in the drive-through at Del Taco with my boyfriend the other day.After placing our semi-high maintenance food order, the person taking my order, in a forced monotone voice, unenthusiastically asks, “Would you like to add our new blah, blah, blah for dessert?”All my sweet-tooth-driven ears heard was “dessert” and I wanted something sugary to complete my four-course drive-through meal. My boyfriend asked if I wanted the donut thing they were trying to push, but I ended up going with a churro.As we received our food, my boyfriend told the server, “Good job on the upsell.”In which we received the same unenthusiastic “thank you” in reply. This all led to a discussion about suggestive selling, how easy it is, how to do it correctly, and how beneficial it is.Of course, this Del Taco drive-through upsell experience did not meet our standards of how to do it correctly, but it worked!

Easy-Peasy
Both my boyfriend and I have sales and hospitality ba…

Is today's market too tough for upscale restaurants?

Operating a restaurant is never easy, but is it particularly challenging for upscale restaurants?

Restaurants Unlimited Inc., for instance, which operates 35 fine-dining and “polished casual” eateries, filed for bankruptcy in Delaware last week. Earlier in June, the Four Seasons Restaurant, an iconic spot for power lunch in Manhattan also closed for business after its reopening within less a year.

Are these two examples an isolated case or the tip of the iceberg? Then, if upscale restaurants are struggling to survive in today’s market, what challenges are they facing?

The rising labor cost

According to the Bloomberg report, Restaurant Unlimited Inc. hires 50 salaried employees at the chain’s headquarter in Seattle, plus another 168 full-time and 1,885 part-time restaurant workers. The rising wages in Seattle, San Francisco, and Portland have resulted in a total of $10.6 million wage expenses in the fiscal year of 2019. Nevertheless, its revenue for the year ended in May dropped 1%, at $…

Are consumers loyal to home-sharing services? Implications for hosts, room-sharing websites, and hoteliers