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Top Universities in Corporate Recruiters’ Mind - Part I

The Wall Street Journal asked 842 recruiting executives to rank the top universities with the best bachelor-degree graduates who are best-trained and educated and best able to succeed after hire. Based on the results of 479 responses, the top three universities are Penn State, Texas A&M, and University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. My home school Texas Tech (as shown in the pictures) is named the No. 18 in the list.

The costs for college recruiting could run up to $5,000 per grad. During recession, corporate has greatly curtailed recruiting budget. Recruiters want to make sure their effort has good return. One indication of success is to measure how many grads are hired and how long these hires will stay within the company. As a result, recruiters like those schools who have the most prepared and well-rounded students, whose graduates fit well into the corporate culture, and those with the best track record over time. In particular, employers like schools where they can form partnerships with both professors and students.

My dissertation was also about college recruitment and employee selection. I found similar research findings regarding those grads who received job offers. I also worked in the Career Center in the College of Human Sciences at Texas Tech before. I understand the important role a faculty or a staff member plays in the college recruitment-selection process. As an assistant professor at SU, I reach out and work hard to build relationships between SU and industry professionals. However, I don’t believe my sole effort would help. A long-term partnership has to be formed with three parties’ efforts --- corporate recruiters, faculty and staff members in a university, and students. Tomorrow, I will further discuss the implications of this Wall Street Journal report to today’s college students. What are your thoughts?

References:
Evans, T. (2010, September 13). State schools lure more employers: Recruiters like one-stop-shopping for grads with solid academics, job skills, record of success. The Wall Street Journal, p. B1, B8. (http://on.wsj.com/aLwYwE)

Comments

  1. While reading this article, I do agree that it is very difficult to find a job after college. In my opinion, I can see it from hands on. My brother who has graduated from Boston University, does have a job up on Boston with a finance company. Though, he has been looking to find a job in New York City, it has been very difficult and is taking a lot of time. Meanwhile my dad is in the finance industry and does know a lot of people, but that not not necessarily help. I can see that it is very difficult and hard to find a job after college. Even though I am a sophomore in college, I have not yet looked for a job, but I have had an internship this past summer. Finding an internship is rather hard and not easy. My dad helped me a lot through people that he knew. I agree with this article and believe that networking is a great way to find a job out there. I feel that once I graduate it will difficult to find a job but I know that I am very passionate in what i do.

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  2. This article was very interesting and very true. Although I am only a sophomore at SU I have already found it difficult to find internships and jobs. I feel that a large part of graduates who get jobs after college greatly has to do with who they know. Networking is extremely important and the more you network in the beginning of college will probably help you more when you are out of college. I also think the more experience one has in their industry helps a lot. I hope to gain as much experience as possible in the hospitality industry in order to secure a job after I graduate. I know this will not be easy but I am eager to work my hardest and try everything that the hospitality industry has to offer.

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  3. It is hard for many students to grasp the idea until later on, sometime too late, that their life is in their own hands and that they should be even grateful there is a support system in place at the university such as the faculty and career center to help students find jobs suitable for them. It is also sometimes hard for some to work hard on documents such as resumes and meeting with recruiters and faculty while juggling school work to only find out they have not been accepted for the position or internship. Though the people willing to do these things have an advantage, and it also builds characters, which is necessary to compete with those that have connections and don't need to do a thing.

    Lorenz

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  4. Thank you for the inputs. Opportunities are presented to the people are prepared. :) Keep up with your good work!

    ReplyDelete

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